Ghost Literature from Morrison to Nguyen

Course Description

From Hamlet to Turn of the Screw, the ghost has been a consistent part of literatures written in the English language. What appeals about them depends upon who you ask and about which era or movement you inquire. Unlike previous eras, in contemporary times, ghosts are figures that most think are likely not real—even if we are fascinated by their representation in novels, poems, stories, and film. Indeed, we even use ‘ghost’ in our relationship slang, as in “He ghosted me after one date.” This course begins with this observation and asks why? Why do we so love the figure of the ghost? What appeals to authors in their construction of their own stories about the ghost? What sort of metaphorical work does the ghost do in stories or films in contemporary time? While encountering a variety of cultural texts—including films, novels, stories, poems, television miniseries, and paintings—from the 1970s through the present, this course will focus on pieces that contain the ghost in some form to answer some of the above questions. Students will, therefore, be exposed to a variety of genres of cultural production and will learn and employ the literary critical tools as they develop argumentative writing for the course. All students, regardless of major or familiarity with literary texts listed below, are encouraged to join the course. This course fulfills the Gordon rule.


Course Competencies

Competency 1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of literary genres (including, but not limited to, the short story, poetry, and drama) by:

  1. Defining literary terms
  2. Recognizing particular elements of specific genres
  3. Identifying and explaining the aesthetic qualities of assigned material 

Competency 2: The student will interpret selected readings by: 

  1. Identifying and discussing relevant themes
  2. Analyzing and discussing particular conflicts,ideas,and experiences present in the literary works 

Competency 3: The student will demonstrate an appreciation for the importance of literature in culture by: 

  1. Identifying key writers and works of literature from different historical periods
  2. Analyzing different literary movements
  3. Analyzing the literary works societal contexts 

Competency 4: The student will demonstrate proficiency in written communication by: 

  1. Generating, developing, organizing, and presenting ideas effectively
  2. Developing and selecting communication to purpose, audience, and occasion
  3. Recognizing the conventions of Standard American English 

Required Materials:

  • Laptop, tablet, or other electronic device beyond a cell phone for note-taking, writing, and accessing Zoom, Canvas, Google Drive, OneDrive, and MDConnect.
  • Reminder that Miami is subject to intermittent downpours throughout the year. I recommend always carrying an umbrella.
  • Portable storage (flash drive, email, cloud, etc)
  • Access to YouTube and the Internet
  • As far as readings are concerned, there are only a few required purchases (below). All other readings will be linked to the syllabus and/or available on Google Drive/Canvas:
    • Sula by Toni Morrison
    • Track by Louise Erdrich
    • The Norton Introduction to Literature (Shorter 13th ed.) by Kelly J. Mays
    • Walking with Ghosts by Qwo-Li Driskill
    • Films: Candyman (1992), dir. Bernard Rose; Candyman (2021), dir. Nia DaCosta; La Llorona (2019), dir. Jayro Bustamante

Policies and Expectations

Participation

Students are required to attend class: Come to the classroom on time and prepared (having done the reading/s or assignment/s), at least attempt all classwork activities, turn in assigned work when due, participate fully in good faith in any peer work, participate in class discussion, focus on the work at hand, and conduct oneself in a manner appropriate to the college classroom.

As our class will be conducted in-person, COVID-19 restrictions will be strictly-enforced. For more information on COVID-19 restrictions and guidance, go to www.mdc.edu/coronavirus/ or www.miamidade.gov/global/initiatives/coronavirus/home.page

Rubric for class participation

5Student is always attentive and contributes relevant insight very often, completing all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
4Student is attentive and completes all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
3Student is distracted but completes all in-class assignments
2Student is often distracted and off-task, hesitant and unreceptive to collaboration
1Student does not complete in-class assignments
0Student is absent

On Writing and Reading

This class will ask a lot of you in terms of writing and reading. You are likely to do more reading in a quicker time in this course than any other course you have taken before. I will, before class, ask that you respond to several informal prompts on Canvas in the hopes you will at least attempt to do this work. Homework is a small part of your participation grade but will be immensely helpful to you in thinking about the texts we are discussing and formulating a topic for your major assignments. I understand and respect that you have a personal life beyond our classroom. This notwithstanding, I expect you will come to class having at least attempted to do the assigned reading and writing all the way through and having prepared notes, ideas, or questions to discuss with the class.

Revision is a central and integral part of this course and any writing course of merit. In order for your writing to be consistently improving, you must bring it through multiple drafts of revision. Revision, then, is a requirement of this course. You will upload free-write, journaling, even outlines and sketches, to your Google Drive folder. Failure to do so will cast a burden of proof on your having done consistent revision in good faith for each assignment, and this will be reflected in your grades.

Attendance

Each student is allotted 4 unexcused absences and 3 tardies. Absences beyond this may result in deductions from the student’s final grade. Excessive absences will result in the student failing the course. After a student has been late (tardy) 3 times, each following time the student is late will result in 1/3 an absence. This means once a student has been late to class 6 times, they will receive an absence. Students who acknowledge holy days on the same day(s) we have class will be excused.

In-person attendance is required as scheduled. If at some point in the semester you cannot attend class sessions due to illness, injury, or other approved absence, you should contact the professor and check the syllabus for any work missed. Absences do not excuse any due dates or work missed. Therefore, it is important that starting from the first week of class, you and your colleagues set up points of contact so that, in the case you are absent, they will be able to provide you with discussion notes from lecture.

Electronics Policy and Google Drive vs. Canvas

  • Each student is required to have a tablet, laptop, or similar electronic device in order to take notes, complete and submit in-class writing assignments, access readings or notes for class discussion, and participate in peer review. 
  • We will spend most of our class time working in Google Drive, a cloud-based file sharing system to which each student will have access. Students will be given links via Canvas Navigation Menu to our class folder with readings, as well as the syllabus, assignment sheets, and folders for uploading drafts during peer review.
  • All assignments, including final drafts, Canvas Discussion Board posts, and peer review reflections will be submitted on Canvas. Unless a student has no access to Canvas—in which case he or she should email their assignment to the instructor—failure to upload assignments will result in failure of the assignment. For extensions, email the instructor. It is up to the student to make sure you always have access to your Canvas and the Internet. Inability to access Canvas will not be a sufficient excuse for not turning in assignments on time. 
  • For IT help, MDC’s Office of Information Technology can be reached at https://chat.edusupportcenter.com/chat/websiteChat?short_name=miamidadehd&key=MDCHD2359. Live specialists are available 24/7. 

Legal Disclosures for Class Recordings, Content Sharing: 

  • Students are expressly prohibited from recording any part of this course. Meetings of this course might be recorded by the College. Any recordings will be available to students registered for this class as they are intended to supplement the classroom experience. 
  • Students are expected to follow appropriate College policies and maintain the security of passwords used to access recorded lectures. 
  • Recordings may not be reproduced, shared with those not in the class, or uploaded to other online environments. 
  • If the instructor or a Miami-Dade College office plans any other uses for recordings of class beyond this section, students identifiable in the recordings will be notified to request consent prior to such use. 
  • This instructor is the copyright owner of the courseware; individual recordings of the materials on Canvas and/or of any sessions are not allowed. Such materials cannot be shared outside the classroom environment without express permission.

On Controversy and Alternative Assignments

Every student, no matter their identity, ideology, or ability, is welcome and valued in this class. This class will ask that we all confront political, social, and ideological questions that may be deemed controversial. I encourage you not to shy away from this opportunity to think through these issues. No matter what, no student should ever feel unwelcome or unsafe in this classroom. If you ever find that you are inappropriately uncomfortable or unable to do any assignment, let me know immediately and I can offer an alternative assignment for you to complete.

Counseling

Miami-Dade College provides professional support to students no matter their gender expression, sexual preferences, sex, race, financial or immigration status. You can make an appointment by going to www.mdc.edu/singlestop/services/mental-health-counseling-/ or going to the campus’s Single Stop Office:

Accessibility

Students with accessibility requirements are provided for by A Comprehensive Center for Exceptional Student Services (ACCESS) and may contact this office in Room 1180, Wolfson Campus, (305) 237-3072 or via email at waccess@mdc.edu to make any requests for accessibility. If you have trouble contacting ACCESS, let me know and I will help you. If you have contacted ACCESS and have any requirements of me, please be sure to let me know as soon as possible.

The Reading and Writing Center (www.mdc.edu/wolfson/english/reading-writing/) can help you at any stage of the writing process.  Appointments are suggested, but they also accept ‘walk-in’ visits.  If I think it’s necessary, I will ask you to use the Reading and Writing Center on a regular basis. You can learn more about the reading and writing center and all of the workshops and other resources available to you there by going to spark.adobe.com/page/oZJh67ulEFCAI/. You can make an appointment on EAB Navigate.

OWL @ Purdue is a great online resource for writing and research techniques. It can be located at https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html.

Extra Credit is only available or permitted in this course at the discretion of the professor. I personally do not enjoy the use of extra credit because I believe it is unfair to those who have committed to the work required of this class if others are able to do extra work for credit. Moreover, extra credit requires extra effort and time to which I am unable to commit for reading, annotating, grading, and categorizing within the gradebook. However, in the event that you visit the writing center (see above), I am alerted via email by the center that you attended a meeting with a tutor. In the case that you visit the writing center, you can receive up to and not exceeding five (5) points on that essay assignment.

On Communication

I will make a point to learn each of your names and I expect you will learn to use one another’s name in conversation, as well (“I agree with what ___ said”). This will create a welcoming and meaningful culture for our classroom. If you have a question about the policies or assignments for this class, you may speak to me before, during, or after class, via email, or in office hours. I will make a point to reply to your email within 24-to-48 hours. If you have not received a response from me after two days, you should email me again. Please do not email me to ask questions about an assignment one or two days before it is due as this will not allow due time for me to respond and for you to use this answer in writing your assignment.

Academic Honor Code

As a student of Miami-Dade College, you have agreed to uphold the Student Rights and Responsibilities code of conduct. Violation of this code includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, or academic dishonesty. The Student’s Rights and Responsibilities Handbook defines each of these violations:

“Academic dishonesty includes the following actions, and those that are similar in nature, with respect to a student’s academic performance.

  1. Cheating on an examination including unauthorized sharing of information
  2. Collaborating with others in work to be submitted, if contrary to the stated rules of the course 
  3. Plagiarizing, taking and claiming as one’s own the ideas, writings, or work of another, without citing the sources 
  4. Submitting, work from another course unless permitted by the instructor”

Any student who violates this clause will fail not only the assignment but the entire course. Each of you has the ability to think through your own unique ideas. If you are thinking of violating this code of conduct because you are overwhelmed or in distress, speak with me and we will come up with a better solution.

Grades

If you have a question or concern about an assignment or participation grade, please come and see me during my office hours or talk with me before or after class to arrange a meeting.  Due to federal requirements, MDC faculty are not permitted to discuss grades via email or phone, so we will need to meet in person and in private via Zoom.

Overall Grade Distribution:                                                                               

Attendance & Class Participation: 5%
Throughline short essays: 10%
Midterm: 20%
Close-Reading Assignment: 15%
Podcast episode: 15%
Literary movement presentation: 15%
Final Exam: 20%                          
Total:                      100%

Grading Scale:

A: 90-100
B: 80-89
C: 70-79
D: 60-69
F: 0-59

A – Exemplary  B – Effective       C – Sufficient      D – Unsatisfactory         F – Failure

Assignments

Podcast Episode (15%)

Assignment Directions: This assignment asks you to write, produce, and record yourself and partner(s) for a small episode (30 mins. max) of our semester-long podcast, the title for which we will brainstorm in the early days of class. You and your partner(s) will sign up for a topic and weeklong commitment to produce 1 episode. You will have three major deadlines for this episode: (1) outline, (2) script, (3) upload-ready episode recording. There are many resources online for writing, producing, and editing your own podcast — I recommend you take advantage of these and other resources like YouTube tutorial videos. In class, the instructor will produce the first ‘introductory’ episode, so you are able to see one method of production from start to finish.

In-Class or Out-of-Class: Out of class

Due Date: Depends upon which week/topic you and your partner(s) sign onto

Requirements: On Monday of the week you have been assigned, you will turn in a rough outline of the episode, which should include any textual information like quotations or research for your topic as well as a plan for discussion between you and your partner(s) – who speaks when and what do they say. By Thursday night at midnight, you should have a rough script for the podcast. Your final recording is due before midnight Sunday night. 

Weekly Throughline Essays (10% total)

Assignment Directions: Each week, you will write a short essay (250-500 words) wherein you will reflect on the readings for that week and what sort of motifs, themes, or devices interest you. As this is a weekly assignment and many of our readings will span multiple weeks, consider what thematic through-lines are being developed in the readings. You might also reflect on any historical information you learn or discover about the text (but be sure to always cite your sources and make sure the focus of your writing remains on the text, not literary history).

In-Class or Out-of-Class: Mostly out-of-class, though some may be begun in-class

Due Date: Before midnight on Sunday nights

Requirements: 500-750 words ea. While quotations will be helpful to make your connections between sources, this must be original work – so most of the writing should be your own words. If you use any information from any source, be sure to properly cite both within the essay and with a Works Cited/Bibliography at the end of the essay. The req. word count does not include this works cited page. [Note: you will not need to turn in a Throughline Essay for the week you are producing a podcast episode or the week you are presenting in class].

Literary Movements Presentation (15%)

Assignment Directions: This project asks that students research and present information on one specific literary movement. Options for which movement to choose will be discussed in class and students may work in pairs or groups (max of 3 people). Slideshows should be submitted at least one week prior to presentation date so the professor may give feedback on the slides and they may be revised prior to the presentation. Included in the presentation’s content should be major aspects of the literary style, how it came to be historically (including inspirations from previous historical events or movements), and who some of the main writers are that are associated with the movement.

In-Class or Out-of-Class: Out of class

Due Date: Slides due 1 week before presentation date, presentation date depends on sign-up

Requirements: Slides should not be crowded with text – instead, students should prepare to speak more than what is written on the slides. The slides function as reminders and major points, not scripts. All information gathered from outside sources should be cited properly on a works cited slide at the end of the slideshow or within the slideshow itself. At least 3 writers should be mentioned as having been associated with the movement and why. If in a pair or group, each student should participate equally. (maximum presentation time 25 mins.)

Midterm Quiz (15%)

At midterms, students should be prepared to take a quiz based on information discussed in class up to this point in the semester – information regarding readings, interpretations of the readings, themes of discussions. Additionally, students will be quizzed on literary devices, genres, and movements presented up to this point in the semester. The quiz will contain a variety of question types, including short answer, multiple choice, and one short essay.

Close-Reading Assignment (15%) 

Assignment Directions: This brief analysis paper will require you to select a passage from a written or visual text we have discussed in class. To be successful, the close-reading must be an argumentative interpretation of the literariness of the text – thematic, or otherwise. Note that this is not a report on what the author is saying or a summary. While it will be important to reference plot points, this assignment is meant to argue what the text is doing. Explain how the writer or director conveys their story or argument. The essay should focus on one central argument, not several unrelated portions of the text.

In-Class or Out-of-Class: Out of class (peer review via Canvas)

Due Date: Draft to be uploaded to Canvas before class time Dec 6; final draft due to Canvas by 11:59 p.m. Dec 11

Requirements: 1100 words minimum (~4.5 pages double-spaced)

Final Exam (20%)

The final exam will contain a variety of questions, including short answer, multiple choice, true/false, and one short essay. The material covered will be based on the competencies for LIT2000 at MDC, which are detailed above. An exam study guide will be available on Canvas one week prior to the exam. Content covered in the exam will include questions related to the readings and discussions from the course, including specific questions about literary devices and major literary movements. Students will also be asked to reflect on their previous assignments, including the close-reading essay, the podcast episode, and the literary movements presentation. When necessary, students should always cite sources of information; however, students will not be required to directly quote from texts.


Course Schedule

Week 1                                    

T 8/23         Review Syllabus

“Ghost Trap / Trampo de espanto” by Gloria Anzaldúa
 

         Homework: Read “La Prieta” and “El paisano is a bird of good omen” by Gloria Anzaldúa

R 8/25         Gloria Anzaldúa

         Homework: Read “The Presence” and Prietita and the Ghost Woman by Gloria Anzaldúa

{ F 8/26 — Last day to add course or drop course and receive refund } 

 

Week 2                                    

T 8/30         Gloria Anzaldúa

         Homework: Read Sula by Toni Morrison (pp. )

R 9/1        Sula

         Homework: Read Sula by Toni Morrison (pp. )

Week 3                                    

T 9/6         Sula

         Homework: Read Sula by Toni Morrison (pp. 

R 9/8         Sula

         Homework: Read Sula by Toni Morrison (pp. )

Week 4                                    

T 9/13         Sula
The art of Kenturah Davis

         Homework: Read Sula by Toni Morrison (pp. 

R 9/15         Sula

         Homework: Read Sula by Toni Morrison (pp. -end)

Week 5                                     

T 9/20         Sula

         Homework:  Read “Slaveships”; “lost baby poem”; “sorrow song”; and “far memory” by Lucille Clifton

R 9/22         Presentation 1: American Romanticism (Transcendentalism)

         Homework: Read “Black-Eyed Women” by Viet Thanh Nguyen

Week 6                                    

T 9/27         Nguyen’s story alongside Nothing Ever Dies

         Homework: Read “Of Ghosts and Shadows” by Roxane Gay

R 9/29         Presentation 2: American Gothic
“Of Ghosts and Shadows”

         Homework: Read “Ghosts” by Jaquira Díaz; prepare for Midterm

Week 7                                    

T 10/4        MIDTERM

         Homework: Read Tracks by Louise Erdrich (pp. ) 

R 10/6        Presentation 3: American Realism, Naturalism
Tracks

         Homework: Read Tracks by Louise Erdrich (pp. )

Week 8                                    

T 10/11         Tracks

         Homework: Read Tracks by Louise Erdrich (pp. )

R 10/13         Presentation 4: American Modernism
Tracks

         Homework: Read Tracks by Louise Erdrich (pp. )

Week 9                                    

T 10/18        Tracks

         Homework: Read Tracks by Louise Erdrich (pp. )

R 10/20         Presentation 5: Post-Modernism
Tracks

         Homework: Read Tracks by Louise Erdrich (pp. -end)

Week 10                                    

T 10/25         Tracks

         Homework: Watch La Llorona (2019), dir. Jayro Bustamante – note that this is not The Curse of La Llorona (an English language film) but is a Spanish-language film produced and filmed in Guatemala

R 10/27         La Llorona dir. Jayro Bustamante

         Homework: Rent and watch Candyman (2021), dir. Nia DaCosta and Candyman (1992), dir. Bernard Rose – see Course Documents for links.

{ M 10/30 — Last day to drop course and receive “W” }

 

Week 11                                    

T 11/1         films & “The Forbidden” by Clive Barker

         Homework: Watch The Ghost Writer (based on the novel by Philip Roth)

R 11/3         The Ghost Writer 

         Homework: Draft Close-Reading Assignment

Week 12                                    

T 11/8         Peer Review Session via Canvas: Complete 1 Peer Review & 1 Revision Reflection

         Homework: Close Reading final draft due to Canvas before 11:59 p.m. Nov 11th, 2022

R 11/10         Rose Red (in class)

         Homework: Read “The Woman Hanging in the Thirteenth Floor Window” by Joy Harjo and “Blue Dementia” by Yusef Kumanyakaa

Week 13                                    

T 11/15         Harjo & Kumanyakaa

         Homework: Read Walking with Ghosts by Qwo-Li Driskill (pp )

R 11/17         Walking with Ghosts

         Homework: Read Walking with Ghosts by Qwo-Li Driskill (pp -end)

Week 14                                    

T 11/22         Walking with Ghosts 

         Homework: Read “Introduction: Bringing Ghosts to Ground” from Phantom Past, Indigenous Presence: Native Ghosts in North American Culture & History

R 11/24         * * No Class: Break * *

         Homework: See above

Week 15                                    

T 11/29         Boyd, Thrush

         Homework: Read “‘We Are Standing in My Ancestor’s Longhouse’: Learning the Language of Spirits and Ghosts” by Colleen E. Boyd

R 12/1         Boyd

         Homework: Read “Haunting Remains: Educating a New American Citizenry at Indian Hill Cemetery” by Sarah Schneider Kavanagh 

Week 16                                    

T 12/6         Kavanagh

         Homework: Read Foreword to Ghostly Matters 2008 edition

R 12/8         Ghostly Matters
Review for final exam

         Homework: Final Exam will be in-person December 15th 11:00am—12:30pm

American Ghost Literature from Morrison to Nguyen

Course: LIT 2000
Course Title: Introduction to Literature
Course Credits: 3 hrs
Instructor: Preston Taylor Stone
Instructor email: pstone@mdc.edu

Course Description

Black As the Most Exquisite Color (2019), Kenturah Davis
Pippy Houldsworth Gallery (houldsworth.co.uk)

From Hamlet to Turn of the Screw, the ghost has been a consistent part of literatures written in the English language. What appeals about them depends upon who you ask and about which era or movement you inquire. Unlike previous eras, in contemporary times, ghosts are figures that most think are likely not real—even if we are fascinated by their representation in novels, poems, stories, and film. Indeed, we even use ‘ghost’ in our relationship slang, as in “He ghosted me after one date.” This course begins with this observation and asks why? Why do we so love the figure of the ghost? What appeals to authors in their construction of their own stories about the ghost? What sort of metaphorical work does the ghost do in stories or films in contemporary time? While encountering a variety of cultural texts—including films, novels, stories, poems, television miniseries, and paintings—from the 1970s through the present, this course will focus on pieces that contain the ghost in some form to answer some of the above questions. Students will, therefore, be exposed to a variety of genres of cultural production and will learn and employ the literary critical tools as they develop argumentative writing for the course. All students, regardless of major or familiarity with literary texts listed below, are encouraged to join the course. This course fulfills the Gordon rule.

Untitled (parade) (2016), Kevin Beasley
Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM.org)
  • Sula by Toni Morrison
  • “Slaveships”; “lost baby poem”; “sorrow song”; “far memory” by Lucille Clifton
  • The Ghost Writer by Philip Roth
  • Prietita and the Ghost Woman; “The Postmodern Llorona”; “The Presence” by Gloria Anzaldúa
  • Tracks by Louise Erdrich
  • Rose Red series (based on Stephen King novel)
  • Part One: The United States of America in Almanac of the Dead by Leslie Marmon Silko
  • Candyman (1992), dir. Bernard Rose & Candyman (2021), dir. Nia DaCosta
  • “Of Ghosts and Shadows” by Roxane Gay
  • “The Woman Hanging in the Thirteenth Floor Window” by Joy Harjo
  • “Blue Dementia” by Yusef Kumanyakaa
  • “Black-Eyed Women” by Viet Thanh Nguyen
  • La Llorona (2019), dir. Jayro Bustamante

Marxism in America

History, Theory, Culture

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI). Summer 1-2, 2022

Course Title: Marxism in America: History, Theory, Culture
Duration: 12 Weeks
Course: Spring 1 and 2 of 2022
Dates: Jan 14-April 15 (with break Feb 19-March 6)
Time: Fridays 3:00pm-4:45pm

Course Description:

Contrary to popular belief, socialist ideas are not new to the American political scene. Throughout American history, there have been several left-leaning political movements who found their inspiration from Karl Marx’s writings and the philosophers and political economists who came after calling themselves Marxists. The so-called ‘red scare’s of American history reveal concerted efforts by the U.S. government to both publicly and secretly stifle left-leaning political movements that would encourage class solidarity or redistribution of wealth in America. Unfortunately, what this has meant is that the majority of people in today’s United States do not have an accurate understanding of Marxism, its philosophy of history or its politics of economy. This course attempts to right this wrong.

We will consider the economichistorical, and anthropological as well as sociological inspirations and outcomes in the American political system of Marxist thought. In short, the class will provide students with a deeper understanding of Marx, the Marxist view of history, philosophy, and political economy, and the internationalist and anti-imperialist politics that developed in the United States inspired by Marxist ideologies throughout the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. By reading the work of writer-activists like Emma Goldman, Claudia Jones, Huey P. Newton, George Jackson, Angela Y. Davis and many others, we will connect the theoretical terms Marx and other philosophers developed to different political movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. Finally, we will consider the contemporary moment: what kind of Marxist politics are developing in America in the 21st century? What version of left-leaning politics can exist in the U.S. after the supposed ‘fall’ of communism in the early 1990s? Where and how does Marxism reside in the U.S. today?  To confront these final questions, we will engage with both fictional and documentary films in the 21st century, including Bee MovieSpirited AwayChicken Run13thChildren of MenIn Time, and others.

Suggested Purchases

  • Paul Buhle, Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left (2013), ~$31
  • Michael Harrington, Socialism: Past and Future (1989), ~$16

Schedule

(readings are meant to be done before the class during which they will be discussed)

May 6 – Marxism: what it is …and isn’t

Reading:

  • Several small sections of Socialism 101 by Kathleen Sears
  • “The Propaganda of History” by W.E.B. DuBois
  • Ch. 2 “Gravediggers” from The Socialist Manifesto by Bhaskar Sunkara
  • Ch. 1 “The Commodification of Everything” from Historical Capitalism by Immanuel Wallerstein
  • Watch Chicken Run (film)

May 13 – Immigrant beginnings (1865-1900): Jewish Socialism in NYC 

Reading:

  • Ch. 1 “Immigrant Socialism” of Paul Buhle’s Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left
  • Ch. 4 “The Creation of a Geoculture: Ideologies, Social Movements, Social Science” from World Systems Analysis: An Introduction by Immanuel Wallerstein
  • Ch. 2 “Socialisms” of Michael Harrington’s Socialism: Past and Future
  • Ch. 2 “The Politics of Accumulation: Struggle for Benefits” from Historical Capitalism by Immanuel Wallerstein
  • Introduction “Socialism in American Jewish History” from A Fire In Their Hearts: Yiddish Socialists in New York by Tony Michels
  • Watch Spirited Away (film)

May 20 – Distinctly American Socialism 

Reading:

May 27 – The Debs Era

Reading:

  • Ch. 3 “Marxism in the Debs Era” from Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left by Paul Buhle
  • Ch 7 “Socialism and America” from Bhaskar Sunkara’s The Socialist Manifesto

June 3 – Leninism in America

Reading:

  • Ch. 4 “Leninism in America” from Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left by Paul Buhle
  • Ch 5 “‘Simply a Stupid Piece of Despotism’: How Socialists Saved the First Amendment” from The “S” Word: A Short History of an American Tradition…Socialism by John Nichols
  • Ch. 5 “Negroes Ain’ Black-But Red!: Black Communists and the Culture of Opposition” from Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression by Robin D.G. Kelley
  • Podcast: “History of the IWW: Militant Unionism, Wobblie Internationalism, & Class War” and “Black Bolshevik: The Life of Harry Haywood” from Revolutionary Left Radio

Break: June 4–June 23

June 24 – Authoritarian Collectivisms

Reading:

  • Ch. 3 “Authoritarian Collectivisms” from Socialism: Past and Future by Michael Harrington
  • The remainder of Ch. 3 “Leninism in America” from Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left by Paul Buhle
  • passages from Maoism and the Chinese Revolution: A Critical Introduction by Elliott Liu
  • passages from The Permanent Revolution by Leon Trotsky
  • Ch. 6, “The Third World Revolution” from The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality by Bhaskar Sunkara
  • Marxist vocab Flashcards: https://quizlet.com/557705059/marxism-in-america- terminology-flash-cards/

June 30 – Rise of the Culture Critique (1925-1940)

Reading:

  • Ch. 5 “Rise of the Culture Critique” in Marxism in the United States by Paul Buhle
  • Selections from Prison Notebooks by Antonio Gramsci
  • Selections from The Oxford Handbook of Communist Visual Cultures, ed. Xiaoning Lu, Aga Skrodzka, K. Marciniak
  • Watch Children of Men (dir. Alfonso Cuarón)

July 7 – After Leninism (1940-1960)

Reading:

July 14 – The New Left and Decolonization 

Reading:

  • Ch. 7 “The New Left” in Marxism in the United States by Paul Buhle
  • Ch. 6 “The Third Creation of the World” from Socialism Past and Future by Michael Harrington
  • Passages from the Huey P. Newton Reader
  • 2 chapters from Assata: An Autobiography by Assata Shakur
  • Viewings: BlacKkKlansman and The Trial of the Chicago 7

July 21 – Neoliberalism and Neocolonialism

Reading:

  • Ch. 6 “The Third Creation of the World” from Socialism: Past and Future by Michael Harrington
  • Ch 14 “The Great Dismantling” from Land of Promise: An Economic History of the United States by Michael Lind
  • In Time (film) and Life and Debt (film)
  • “Free Trade: Neoliberal Fantasy” from Democracy and Other Neoliberal Fantasies by Jodi Dean

July 28 – Visionary Gradualism & Battling the Era of Growing Inequality

Reading:

  • Ch. 8-9 “Market and Plan” and “Visionary Gradualism” of Socialism: Past and Future by Michael Harrington
  • Ch 8-10 “Return of the Mack” “How We Win” and “Stay Fly” of The Socialist Manifesto by Bhaskar Sunkara

The Ghosts of American Imperialism

Institution: University of Miami
Course: English Composition II
Course Credits: 3 hrs
Instructor: Preston Taylor Stone
Email: ptstone@miami.edu
Office Hours: By appt. (Zoom)

Course Description

This course begins with a queer ghost story set in the Caribbean: Haiti, where the United States staked formal occupation from 1915-1934. Yet, many argue the U.S. was and has remained a ghostly presence in the country long before and long after this timespan. Through the interrogation of cultural and theoretical texts on the Caribbean, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East this course poses the U.S. as not only a formal imperial power in the region but as a ghost, haunting its colonial provinces with on-going political, gendered, and racial violence.

Students will encounter cultural and theoretical texts, including narrative, film, poetry, and anthropological or ethnographic studies, and will develop several pieces of short writing that put these in conversation. By the end of the course, students will have a ready grasp of American imperial projects in the Caribbean, Middle East, and Southeast Asia from 1898-to-present and will have a portfolio of academic and research writing on this subject. Emphasis will be placed on the skills of close-reading, interrogating theory, and research. By the end of the course, students will demonstrate the ability to combine material from several relevant sources into pieces of academic writing, use formal citation techniques accordingly, and participate in multiple rounds of revising their academic writing using peer review.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course, students will exhibit the ability to

  • Demonstrate effective written communication skills in relation to specific rhetorical tasks.
  • Construct original, well-reasoned arguments using a range of materials
  • Find, evaluate, integrate, and synthesize appropriate and relevant primary and secondary sources in their writing
  • Engage in close-reading of texts
  • Cite sources formally (using MLA, APA, Chicago, or other citation formats)

Required Materials

  • Regular access to a computer and portable storage (flash drive, email, cloud, etc)
  • Access to YouTube
  • Most texts will be provided on Google Drive and linked on the schedule section of this document. You will be expected to print and bring these to class or have full access to them during class. As far as textbooks for this class are concerned, there are two required purchases. All others will be shared via PDF.
Candyman (2021), dir. Nia DaCostaAppleTV ($5.99)
YouTube ($5.99)
Vudu ($5.99)
Amazon Prime Video ($5.99)
Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination (2008) by Avery F. GordonBookshop
Barnes & Noble
AbeBooks
AmazonSmile
Who Sings the Nation-State? (2010) by Judith Butler and Gayatri Chakravorty SpivakBookshop
Barnes & NobleAbeBooks
AmazonSmile

Policies and Expectations

Participation

Students are required to attend class, come to class on time and prepared (having done the reading/s or assignment/s), at least attempt all classwork activities, turn in assigned work when due, participate fully in good faith in any peer work, participate in class discussion, focus on the work at hand, and conduct oneself in a manner appropriate to the college classroom.

Rubric for class participation
5Student is always attentive and contributes relevant insight very often, completing all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
4Student is attentive and completes all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
3Student is distracted but completes all in-class assignments
2Student is often distracted and off-task, hesitant and unreceptive to collaboration
1Student does not complete in-class assignments
0Student is absent

Face coverings are mandatory at all times (with the exception of when drinking water) while in on-campus class sessions. Failure to follow this requirement is grounds for disciplinary action and may lead to removal from the classroom and/or the course. Single-layer cloth masks are not considered protective against the omicron variant. Surgical masks or multi-layered, tightly woven cloth masks should be used. Masks should fit snugly, cover nose and mouth, and preferably have an adjustable wire nose bridge. Surgical masks will be available at various on-campus locations.

The seat you select on the first day of class must be from among those identified as meeting the physical distance requirements for COVID-19; this seat will be your assigned seat for the remainder of the semester. This will enable the most effective COVID-19 contact tracing, should it be required.

Any student who is fully vaccinated and who has provided proof of vaccination to the University via their MyUHealthChart account will be exempt from COVID-19 surveillance testing during the semester. Any student who is not fully vaccinated or has not provided proof of vaccination will be required to take a COVID-19 test at least twice per week. Students will receive email or text message alerts to schedule their on-campus testing appointments. Students who do not comply with the testing requirement will be referred to the Dean of Students office and may have their campus access—including any on-campus living assignment—revoked and face appropriate disciplinary sanctions.

Completing vaccination is extremely important for every student who is able. As multiple variants continue to develop, scientists warn that this may result in a variant of the coronavirus that is immune to vaccines. As a solution to this problem, the more people who are vaccinated and protected from the virus, the fewer chances the virus has to replicate and change into another variant. If you are physically able to receive the vaccine, you are strongly encouraged to do so and upload proof of vaccination to the MyUHealthChart health app. To find a vaccination location, go to Miami-Dade County’s vaccine locator or the University of Miami’s Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information website. What we know is this: the Omicron variant (the most common in Florida currently) of SARS-CoV-2 is at least twice as contagious as the Delta variant of the virus, and even vaccinated people can spread the Omicron variant. Additionally, while the Delta variant is likely not more deadly than the Delta variant, hospitals are likely to become overwhelmed by patients with comorbid conditions infected with the virus. Vaccination is the only proven way to combat severe symptoms of COVID-19.

On Writing and Reading

This class will ask a lot of you in terms of writing and reading. You are likely to do more reading in a quicker time in this course than any other course you have taken before. I will, before class, ask that you respond to several informal prompts on Blackboard in the hopes you will at least attempt to do this work. Homework is a small part of your participation grade but will be immensely helpful to you in thinking about the texts we are discussing and formulating a topic for your final paper. I understand this is not your only class and I respect that you have a personal life beyond our classroom. Nonetheless, I expect you will come to class having at least attempted to do the assigned reading and writing all the way through and having prepared notes, ideas, or questions to discuss with the class.

Revision is a central and integral part of this course and any writing course of merit. In order for your writing to be consistently improving, you must bring it through multiple drafts of revision. Revision, then, is a requirement of this course. You will upload free-write, journaling, even outlines and sketches, to your Google Drive folder. Failure to do so will cast a burden of proof on your having done consistent revision in good faith for each assignment, and this will be reflected in your grades.

Attendance

Each student is allotted 4 unexcused absences (two whole weeks) and 3 tardies. Absences beyond this may result in deductions from the student’s final grade. Excessive absences will result in the student failing the course. After a student has been late (tardy) 3 times, each following time the student is late will result in 1/3 an absence. This means once a student has been late to class 6 times, they will receive an absence. Students who are consistently distracted in class (texting, browsing the internet, etc.) will be warned to pay closer attention to class. After this warning, if a student is continuously distracted in class, they will be marked absent. Students who acknowledge holy days on the same day(s) we have class will be excused if they have alerted the professor of all of these by the end of three days after you are enrolled in class. Absences do not excuse any due dates or work missed.

Electronics Policy and Google Drive vs. Blackboard

  • Each student is required to bring a tablet, laptop, or similar electronic device to class to take notes, complete and submit in-class writing assignments, access readings or notes for class discussion, and participate in peer review. 
  • No electronic device should be a distraction from the activities of the classroom for any student. 
  • The use of laptops or tablets is allowed only to complete classroom-related activities
  • If electronic devices become a distraction or a means by which students avoid class participation, the student(s) in violation will receive an absence for class that day.

We will spend most of our class time working in Google Drive, a cloud-based file sharing system to which each student at the University of Miami has access. To log-in to your Google Drive:

  1. Visit google.miami.edu 
  2. Use the same credentials you use to access your email, Canelink, and Blackboard interfaces. 

You will have your own folder within the classroom’s folder (“ENG 103 SS21”). Drive is where you will submit your all writing assignments, reflections, and peer reviews with the noted exception of Blackboard posts, which are submitted via the Blackboard Discussion Board.

It is up to the student to make sure they always have access to your Blackboard and Google Drive accounts and folders. Inability to access Google Drive or Blackboard will not be a sufficient excuse for not turning in assignments on time. For IT help, UMIT is located on the third floor of the Richter Library or may be accessed at it.miami.edu.

  • Students are expressly prohibited from recording any part of this course. Meetings of this course might be recorded by the University. Any recordings will be available to students registered for this class as they are intended to supplement the classroom experience. 
  • Students are expected to follow appropriate University policies and maintain the security of passwords used to access recorded lectures. 
  • Recordings may not be reproduced, shared with those not in the class, or uploaded to other online environments. 
  • If the instructor or a University of Miami office plans any other uses for the recordings, beyond this class, students identifiable in the recordings will be notified to request consent prior to such use. 
  • This instructor is the copyright owner of the courseware; individual recordings of the materials on Blackboard and/or of the virtual sessions are not allowed. Such materials cannot be shared outside the physical or virtual classroom environment without express permission.

Academic Honor Code

As a student of the University of Miami, you have agreed to uphold the Honor Code. Violation of this code includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, or academic dishonesty. The Undergraduate Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook defines each of these violations:

Cheating – Implies the intent to deceive. It includes all actions, devices and deceptions used in the attempt to commit this act. Examples include, but are not limited to, copying answers from another student’s exam, and using a cheat sheet or crib notes in an exam.

Plagiarism – is representing the words or ideas of someone else as your own. Examples include, but are not limited to, failing to properly cite direct quotes and failing to give credit for someone else’s ideas.

Collusion – is the act of working together on an academic undertaking for which a student is individually responsible. Examples include, but are not limited to, sharing information in labs that are to be done individually.

Academic Dishonesty – includes any other act not specifically covered that compromises the integrity of a student or intrudes, violates, or disturbs the academic environment of the university community. Examples are attempting or agreeing to commit, or assisting in or facilitating the commission of, any scholastic dishonesty violation, failing to appear or testify without good cause when requested by the Honor Council, failing to keep information about cases confidential, supplying false information to the Honor Council and accusing a student of a violation of this Code in bad faith.” (Title II, B)

Any student who violates the Honor Code will fail not only the assignment but the entire course. Each of you has the ability to think through your own unique ideas. If you are thinking of violating the Honor Code because you are overwhelmed or in distress, speak with me and we will come up with a better solution.

On Accessibility and Acceptance

Every student, no matter their identity, ideology, or ability, is welcome and valued in this class. This class will require that we confront political, social, and ideological questions that may be deemed controversial. I encourage you not to shy away from this opportunity to think through these issues. No matter what, no student should ever feel unwelcome or unsafe in this classroom. If you find that you feel inappropriately uncomfortable, consistently unsafe, or need help, please let me know immediately and I will direct you to the resources that may help. The University of Miami Counseling Center (UMCC) provides professional support to students no matter their gender expression, sexual preferences, sex, race, financial or immigration status. You can make an appointment by calling 305-284-5511, by visiting counseling.studentaffairs.miami.edu, or by visiting the counseling center on Merrick Dr. (across from the Pavia Garage).

Students with accessibility requirements are provided for by the University of Miami’s Office of Disability Services (ODS) and may contact this office at 305-284-2374 or disabilityservices@miami.edu to make any requests for accessibility. If you have trouble contacting the ODS, let me know and I will help you. If you have contacted the ODS and have any requirements of me, please be sure to let me know as soon as possible.

Turning in assignments 

Papers should be submitted on Blackboard or Google Drive on the day and at the specified time they are due. Each day a paper is late, there will be a deduction of 10% from the grade. All assignments are assigned in due time to be completed by each student on time. It is your own job to make sure you do not forget deadlines and that you turn your assignments into the correct platform (Blackboard, email, or Google Drive). Every deadline is listed on this document in the schedule section, on the assignment sheets themselves, and verbally said in class. If you require an extension(s) for your assignment(s), you must request them of the instructor at least three class periods (over a week) prior to the due date of the assignment. Under no circumstances is the instructor required to grant you an extension(s). No late blackboard posts will be accepted.

The Writing Center (www.as.miami.edu/writingcenter) can help you at any stage of the writing process.  Appointments are suggested, but they also accept ‘walk-in’ visits.  If I think it’s necessary, I will ask you to use the Writing Center on a regular basis. Please note that all appointments are currently being held online until further notice.  To make an online appointment, make an account at the above link/sign in as usual and choose an available time.

OWL @ Purdue is a great online resource for writing and research techniques. It can be located at https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html.

Extra Credit is only available or permitted in this course at the discretion of the professor. I personally do not enjoy the use of extra credit because I believe it is unfair to those who have committed to the work required of this class if others are able to do extra work for credit. Moreover, extra credit requires extra effort and time to which I am unable to commit for reading, annotating, grading, and categorizing within the gradebook. However, in the event that you visit the writing center (see above), I am alerted via email by the center that you attended a meeting with a tutor. (I do not have access to what you and the tutor discussed or worked on, only that you worked on something from my class). In the case that you visit the writing center, you can receive up to and not exceeding five (5) points on that essay assignment.

On Communication

I will make a point to learn each of your names and I expect you will learn to use one another’s name in conversation, as well (“I agree with what ___ said”). This will create a welcoming and meaningful culture for our classroom. If you have a question about the policies or assignments for this class, you may speak to me before, during, or after class, via email, or in office hours. I will make a point to reply to your email within 24-to-48 hours. If you have not received a response from me after two days, you should email me again. Please do not email me to ask questions about an assignment one or two days before it is due as this will not allow due time for me to respond and for you to use this answer in writing your assignment.

Grades

If you have a question or concern about an assignment or participation grade, please come and see me during my office hours or talk with me before or after class to arrange a meeting.  Due to federal requirements, UM faculty are not permitted to discuss grades via email or phone, so we will need to meet in person and in private via Zoom.

Overall Grade Distribution:

Attendance & Participation:
Blackboard posts (including Throughline Thursdays):
Quizzes:
Peer Review/Drafting:
Close-Reading Assignment:
Literature Review:
Reading Annotations:
Lensing Assignment:

Total

10%
10%
10%
10%
15%
20%
10%
15%

100%

Grading Scale:

A 94-100
A- 90-93

B+ 87-89
B 83-86
B- 80-82

C+ 77-79
C 73-76
C- 70-72

D+ 67-69
D 60-66

F 0-59

A – Exemplary B – Effective C – Sufficient   D – Unsatisfactory F – Failure

Assignments

Blackboard Posts (On-going)

Directions: Most days, you will have a discussion board post due on Blackboard that asks you to think through something we discussed in-class and/or a reading we have done. Sometimes, these responses will ask you to create a scholarly question for the class. A good example of a scholarly question takes a quotation from the text and then expands upon that in order to pose a new question that the text does not itself consider.
In-class or Out-of-Class: Out of class
Due Date: All posts are due before class time. 
Requirements: 150-250 words ea. To earn full points on your reading responses, you will need to write thoughtful answers in full sentences and/or paragraphs and submit your post before class time. 
Objective: These responses are designed to stimulate your thinking about a text and/or the course themes and help prepare you for class discussion. They are also great places to start generating ideas for your other written assignments. These posts will be graded based on completion, but thoughtful responses will enrich our class discussions and help you develop confidence in your ideas, critical reading skills, and writing. 

Through-Line Thursdays, TLT (On-Going)

Assignment Directions: On most Thursdays, we will have ‘Through-line Thursday’ where you and a partner will connect a minimum of two and a maximum of four sources, one of which must include the reading for that Thursday. The other sources could be something we have previously discussed in this course or something you read, saw, heard outside of class.
In-Class or Out-of-Class: In-class 
Due Date: Most Thursdays
Requirements: 250-350 words ea. These assignments are written in groups and while quotations will be helpful to make your connections between sources, this must be original work so most of the writing should be that of yourself and your group member(s).
Objective: The point of this assignment is to practice making connections between different texts, a skill you will be required to showcase courses beyond this one. Whereas the Blackboard reading responses test comprehension (that you understand what we read/talked about), these in-class writing responses will test argumentation (that you have thoughts about what you’ve read). 

Reading Annotations (On-Going)

Assignment Directions: This project asks each student to annotate readings and post questions about the readings. This is an on-going assignment throughout the first half of the semester—you have until the end of the semester to complete 1200 words of annotations and log them onto your annotation sheet that you turn in. The instructor will explain how to do this logging; however, doing these annotations should be fairly simple. For each reading, the link embedded in the Course Schedule will take you to a PDF in Google Drive. Highlighting certain words and phrases will result in a comment button appearing next to where you have highlighted words. You can annotate by clicking on this “Add Comment” button. 
Due Date: End of Semester
Requirements: 1200 words in total (all annotations combined)
Objective: The purpose of this assignment is to practice annotating scholarly readings, especially those with complex topics that introduce controversial cultural issues and questions. Annotating allows us to deal with our initial reactions to the text and pose questions to what we are reading. In general, annotations should be bridging the content to our thoughts in the same way Blackboard posts allow us to flesh through our thoughts more thoroughly.

Quizzes (no more than 3)

Assignment Directions: Throughout the semester, we may have brief quizzes on common grammatical mistakes and citation formatting. All of these will be reviewed ahead of time and all will be open-notes, so you should not stress about these. However, because you will only be allotted a certain amount of time to complete these quizzes, you should still familiarize yourself with the material before the day of the quiz.
In-Class or Out-of-Class: In-class
Due Date: All will be announced ahead of time (and on Course Schedule below)
Requirements: Answer questions in under 35 minutes.
Objective: The point of this assignment is to help students classify different types of citation styles quickly and to test comprehension of grammatical lessons covered in class. Quizzing is a tool that trains students to access knowledge quickly, ‘on-the-fly’, which is an important skill in academic settings and will prepare students for interrogating complex academic writing.

Close-Reading Assignment (Rough & Final Draft)

Assignment Directions: This brief analysis paper will require you to select a passage from a written text we read in class or another piece of digital media (music video, poetry reading, speech, performance art) and examine how the writer/artist uses language and rhetorical strategies. You may choose to do a close reading of a cultural  text (short story, poem, film, mini-series, documentary, music video) or an academic text (peer reviewed article, monograph chapter). Note that this is not a report on what the author is saying nor is it a summary of the cultural text. While it will be important to understand the cultural text, this assignment is meant to explain how the artist conveys their story or argument (the types of evidence they use, the methods of presenting, the poetic or allegorical language used, the form of presentation).
In-Class or Out-of-Class: Out of class (one-page paper and peer review in-class)
Due Date: Friday, March 11
Requirements: 1200 words minimum
Objective: Close-reading is an essential course outcome of ENG 106 at the University of Miami, as it is a skill necessary for success in and outside of college. Close-reading, or interpretive reading, has been and continues to be relevant to better understand cultural norms, power structures, and other rhetorical and material realities. 

Literature Review (Rough & Final Draft)

Assignment Directions: This assignment will act as an addendum to the Reading Annotations Assignment and Through-Line Thursday posts. Using either sources from the course syllabus or those found through conducting research, you will provide an overview of the existing body of research on a specific topic. This involves tracing the different schools of thought or approaches to the topic, summarizing what other scholars have said, and examining how they agree, disagree, and relate to each other. This is, in short, a report on all of the relevant, recent scholarship about a given topic (or as much as one can find). Think of this as if you are stepping into the ongoing scholarly conversation about this topic and your goal is to outline each of the strands of that conversation. 
In-Class or Out-of-Class: Out of class (peer review in-class)
Due Date: Friday, April 15
Requirements: Minimum of 8 peer-reviewed sources; 1300 words minimum
Objective: This performance of research and abridging arguments of other scholars is an important part of recognizing there is an ongoing interest in a topic you are researching and it will be very important to do as you continue in your academic career. The literature review will help you situate your own thoughts within existing scholarly research. 

Lensing Assignment (Rough & Final Draft)

Assignment Directions: This assignment asks you to use a theoretical or conceptual text as a framework to read a primary text, such as a creative or fictional work. One way to approach this is to imagine yourself as the author of the theoretical text and respond to the second text from their perspective. Therefore, the goal of this assignment is to use the concepts and ideas of the theoretical text as a “lens” to evaluate and interpret the cultural text. 
In-class or out-of-class: Out of class (one-page paper and peer review in-class)
Due Date: Tuesday, May 10
Requirements: Your paper may be given in multimodal form (with graphics, animations, etc.) or in a traditional written format. Your essay should be 1250 words minimum.
Objective: All ENG 106 students are required to do this assignment for the very reason that it requires complex thinking to explain a theoretical concept or set of theoretical concepts and then apply these to a given context. It is called a lens assignment because you are using the theoretical concepts as a lens to understand or critique an object of study.

Course Schedule

Course subject to change. When changes are made, students will be notified in writing.

Week 1

R 1/20        “What is an argument?” Activity (Didion quote)
Review Syllabus (esp. Major Assignments, Minor Assignments)
Introduce Debate: Are Ghosts Real?

Homework: Research ghosts, ghostliness, specters, revenants, spirits

Week 2

T 1/25        Quiz #1 (Syllabus)
Work on debate materials with team, including research

Homework: Prep for debate next class

R 1/27        Last Day to Register/Add Course
* * Debate: Are Ghosts Real? * *

Homework: Read “Of Ghosts and Shadows” by Roxane Gay; answer BB post

Week 3

T 2/1        Who are the ghost(s) in Gay’s story?

Homework: Read “Black-Eyed Women” by Viet Thanh Nguyen; answer BB post

R 2/3          Last Day to Drop a Course Without a “W”
The Ghost(s) and ghost-writing in Viet Thanh Nguyen’s story

Homework: Read Forward and Introduction to the New Edition of Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination by Avery F. Gordon; answer BB post

Week 4

T /28          Introduce Avery F. Gordon’s Ghostly Matters
How does Gordon approach ghosts?

Homework: Read Ch. 1, ‘her shape and his hand’ of Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination by Avery F. Gordon; answer BB post

R 2/10          Close-Reading, the method of literary and cultural studies
How is what Gordon doing close-reading?
Reintroduce Close-Reading Assignment

Homework: Read Ch. 1, “Jordan–Afghanistan–GTMO: July 2002–February 2003” (pp. 43-87 in PDF) of Guantánamo Diary by Mohamedou Ould Slahi; answer BB post

Week 5

T 2/15        Watch The Ghosts of Abu Ghraib in-class
Guantánamo Diary by Mohamedou Ould Slahi

Homework: Read “Introduction: My Muslim American Life” from This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror by Moustafa Bayoumi; answer BB post

R 2/17        Discussion of Slahi, Abu Ghraib, Bayoumi

Homework: Read “The Hole” by Hassan Blasim; answer BB post

Week 6

T 2/22         Quiz #2 (Grammar & MLA)
Hassan Blasim’s “The Hole”

Homework: Read “Legitimizing the ‘War on Terror’: Political Myth in Official-Level Rhetoric” by Joanne Esch; answer BB post

R 2/24        The War on Terror & Rhetoric

Homework: Watch “Ghost Dancers” special on PBS (https://www.pbs.org/video/ghost-dancers-6fhofe/); Read poetry by Qwo-Li Driskill

Week 7

T 3/1        Two-Spiritedness, Nationhood
‘ᎠᏎᎩ ᎠᏰᏟ (ASEGI AYETL) Cherokee Two-Spirit People Reimagining Nation’ from Asegi Stories by Qwo-Li Driskill

Homework: Read Ch. 2, ‘distractions’ of Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination by Avery F. Gordon; answer BB post

R 3/3          The Uncanny, the Unconscious, and Gordon’s correction to Freud

Homework: Read Ch. 1, “Exit from Democracy” of Necropolitics by Achille Mbembe; answer BB post

Week 8

T 3/8          What characterizes ‘the Modern World’?

Homework: Prepare draft of Close-Reading Assignment

R 3/10          Close-Reading Assignment Workshop

Homework: Close-Reading Assignment Final Draft due before Sunday, March 20th; Over the break, Read “Necropolitics” (Ch. 3) from Necropolitics by Achille Mbembe, and respond to BB post

* * March 12-20 Spring Recess * *

Week 9

T 3/22        Quiz #3 (Grammar & APA)
Mbembe’s Necropolitics
Introduce Literature Review Assignment

Homework: Read “Imperial Ghosting and National Tragedy: Revenants from Hiroshima and Indian Country in the War on Terror” by Anne McClintock; answer BB post

** Tues. March 22 Last Day to Drop a Course, Receive “W” **

R 3/24        Ariana Grande, Justin Bieber, and ‘ghosting’
Imperial ‘Ghosting’

Homework: Read “Introduction: At the Navel of the Americas” of Colonial Phantoms: Belonging and Refusal in the Dominican Americas, from the 19th Century to the Present by Dixa Ramírez; answer BB post

Week 10

T 3/29        What does ‘ghosting’ mean for Ramírez?

Homework: “Ghosts of Dominican Past, Ghosts of Dominican Present” by Katerina Gonzalez Seligmann; answer BB post

R 3/31        Secondary sources and bibliographic narratives

Homework: Read all of Who Sings the Nation-State? By Judith Butler & Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak; answer bb post

Week 11

T 4/5          Nationalism

Homework: Read Ch. 2, “Photographies of Mourning: Melancholia and Ambivalence in Van DerZee, Mapplethorpe, and Looking for Langston” from Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics by José Esteban Muñoz

R 4/7         Melancholy, Mourning, and Superimposition in Photography

Homework: Prepare rough draft of Literature Bibliography for workshop

Week 12

T 4/12         Literature Review workshop

Homework: Rent and watch Candyman (2021), dir. Nia DaCosta and/or Candyman (1992), dir. Bernard Rose

R 4/14        Quiz #4 (Grammar & Chicago)
Candyman (2021) vs. Candyman (1992)
Gentrification – Toni Morrison’s opening of Sula

Homework: Literature Review final draft due before midnight Sunday; read half of Ch. 4, “not only the footprints but the water too and what is down there” of Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination by Avery F. Gordon; answer BB post

Week 13

T 4/19        Margaret Garner, Toni Morrison and the Slave Narrative
Reintroduce Lensing Assignment

Homework: Read the remainder of Ch. 4, “not only the footprints but the water too and what is down there” of Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination by Avery F. Gordon; answer BB post

R 4/21        Beloved by Toni Morrison
What does it mean ‘to be haunted’?

Homework: Read Ch. 4, “there are crossroads” of Ghostly Matters: Haunting and the Sociological Imagination by Avery F. Gordon; answer BB post

Week 14

T 4/26         Gordon

Homework: Read “Introduction: What Was to Come” from The Other Side of Terror: Black Women and the Culture of US Empire by Erica R. Edwards

R 4/28        Activity: Black Futures

Homework: Prepare Lensing Assignment Draft for workshop

Week 15

T 5/3          Lensing Assignment Workshop
Final Course Evaluations

Homework: Final Draft of Lensing Assignment and Reading Annotations Log due by midnight, Tues. May 10

* * May 4-May 11 Final Exams * *

Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS)

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI). Spring 1-2. 2021

Course Title: “Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies”
Duration: 12 Weeks
Course: Spring 1 and 2 of 2022
Dates: Jan 14-April 15 (with break Feb 19-March 6)
Time: Fridays 3:00pm-4:45pm

Course Description:
As the Native American and Global Indigenous Studies (NAGIS) program at the University of Miami is still in its preliminary phases of creation, this course will bring OLLI ‘into the loop’ so to speak by providing students with an introductory grasp on major concepts, theoretical highlights, and important figures and histories of Native American and Indigenous Studies, also known as American Indian Studies or First Nations Studies. The discipline began after Native student-activists of the late 1960s demanded their universities represent their histories as well as the dominant white histories that had already been part of the educational ‘canon.’ In this course, we will attend to the building of the interdisciplinary field known as Native American and Indigenous Studies with special attention to the Americas, what Amerindians called Turtle Island or Abya Yala. Each week, we will deal with a keyword in Native Studies and then discuss the histories, politics, and disciplinary concerns with the keyword.

Suggested purchases:

  • Native Studies Keywords, ed. Stephanie Nohelani Teves, Andrea Smith, and Michelle H. Raheja (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2015).
  • An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Roxane Dunbar-Ortiz (2015 American Book Award Winner) (2014)

Schedule

(readings are meant to be done before the class during which they will be discussed)

Jan 14 – Keywords: Indigeneity/Indigenous, Native

Reading:

Jan 21 – Keyword: Land 

Reading:

  • Native Studies Keywords, ed. Stephanie Nohelani Teves, Andrea Smith, and Michelle H. Raheja – section titled “Land” pp 59-108 (emphasis on pp. 59-70)
  • Inventing the Indian (2012): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmP3gGj9yjM 
  • An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz (2015 American Book Award Winner) [I have found the PDF of the Dunbar-Ortiz book, so if you are okay reading the text digitally, I’ve included it attached to this email.]
    • “Introduction: This Land” pp. 1-14
    • “Culture of Conquest” pp. 32-42

Jan 28 – Keyword: Sovereignty 

Reading:

Feb 4 – Keywords: Nation, nationhood

Reading:

  • Native Studies Keywords pp 157-198
  • “Boujee Natives” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSn1C_pLpoQ
  • An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz (2015 American Book Award Winner), “Ghost Dance Prophecy: A Nation is Coming” pp. 178-197

Feb 11 – Keywords: blood, tradition

Reading:

  • Native Studies Keywords section on “Tradition” and section on “Blood”
  • ep. 1-3, Reservation Dogs (FX on Hulu)

Feb 18 – Keywords: colonialism, decolonization

Reading:

  • Native Studies Keywords section on Colonialism (pp 271-308)
  • ep. 4-5, Reservation Dogs (FX on Hulu)

Spring Break: February 19-March 6

March 11 – Keyword: Survivance

Reading:

  • Introduction of Native Liberty: Natural Reason and Cultural Survivance by Gerald Vizenor
  • “The War Cry of the Trickster: The Concept of Survivance in Gerald Vizenor’s Bear Island: The War at Sugar Point” by Alan Velie
  • “Ghosts in the Gap: Diane Glancy’s Paradoxes of Survivance” by James Mackay
  • “The Naked Spot: A Journey toward Survivance” by Diane Glancy

March 18 – Keyword: Knowledge

Reading:

  • Native Studies Keywords pp. 309-346 (section titled ‘Indigenous Epistemologies/Knowledges’)
  • “Land as Pedagogy” (chapter 9) from As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

March 25 – Keywords: Literature, Art 

Reading:

  • Selections from When the Light of the World was Subdued, Our Songs Came Through: A Norton Anthology of Native Nations Poetry (2020) ed. Joy Harjo with Leanne Howe, Jennifer Elise Foerster, and Contributing Editors
  • Two essays from Native American Performance and Representation (2009) ed. S.E. Wilmer
  • “Indigenous Futurisms in North American Indigenous Art” by Kristina Baudemann

April 1 – Keywords: Queer, 2-Spirit or, previously (derogatory), berdache

Reading:

  • “Womanish Men and Manlike Women: The Native American Two-Spirit as Warrior” by Roger M. Carpenter
  • “Women, Labor, and Power in the Nineteenth Century Choctaw Nation” by Fay A. Yarbrough
  • “Revisiting Gender in Iroquoia” by Jan V. Noel
  • Introduction & Ch. 2 from Spaces between Us: Queer Settler Colonialism and Indigenous Decolonization (2011) by Scott Lauria Morgensen

April 8 – Keyword: Resistance

Reading:

  • Chapters 10-12 & Conclusion of As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson
  • Watch “The Ghost Dance Religion: Nanissáanah – Wovoka the Prophet” on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdCUv5LWML4
  • Ch 5 of Ghost Dances and Identity: Prophetic Religion and American Indian Ethnogenesis in the Nineteenth Century by Gregory E. Smoak

April 15 – Keyword: Race 

Reading:

  • Chapter 6, “Measuring Identity” from Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation by Malinda Maynor Lowery
  • Chapter 3, “Conceptualizing and Constructing African Indian Racial and Cultural Identities in Antebellum Indian Territory” in African Cherokees in Indian Territory: From Chattel to Citizens by Celia E. Naylor
  • Introduction of Otherwise Worlds: Against Settler Colonialism edited by by Tiffany Lethabo King, Jenell Navarro, and Andrea Smith
  • “Building Maroon Intellectual Communities” by Chris Finley (also in Otherwise Worlds)
  • Introduction of The Black Shoals: Offshore Formations of Black and Native Studies by Tiffany Lethabo King

Marxism in America

History, Theory, Culture

ENG 106. Fall 2021. University of Miami

Readings (Requires UMiami authentication)

Navigation:

Course: ENG 106, Sections S1 and T1
Institution: University of Miami
Course Location: *Check CaneLink*
Course Time: T/TH 4:20-5:35pm (S1), T/TH 6:00-7:15pm (T1)
Course Credit hours: 3
Instructor: Preston Taylor Stone
Email: ptstone@miami.edu
Office Hours: By appointment (Virtual)

Contrary to popular belief, socialist ideas are not new to the American political scene. Throughout American history, there have been several left-leaning political movements who found their inspiration from Karl Marx’s writings and the philosophers and political economists who came after calling themselves Marxists. The so-called ‘red scare’s of American history reveal concerted efforts by the U.S. government to both publicly and secretly stifle left-leaning political movements that would encourage class solidarity or redistribution of wealth in America. Unfortunately, what this has meant is that the majority of people in today’s United States do not have an accurate understanding of Marxism, its philosophy of history or its politics of economy. This course attempts to right this wrong. We will consider the economic, historical, and anthropological as well as sociological inspirations and outcomes in the American political system of Marxist thought. In short, the class will provide students with a deeper understanding of Marx, the Marxist view of history, philosophy, and political economy, and the internationalist and anti-imperialist politics that developed in the United States inspired by Marxist ideologies throughout the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. By reading the work of writer-activists like Emma Goldman, Claudia Jones, Huey P. Newton, George Jackson, Angela Y. Davis and many others, we will connect the theoretical terms Marx and other philosophers developed to different political movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. Finally, we will consider the contemporary moment: what kind of Marxist politics are developing in America in the 21st century? What version of left-leaning politics can exist in the U.S. after the supposed ‘fall’ of communism in the early 1990s? Where and how does Marxism reside in the U.S. today?  To confront these final questions, we will engage with both fictional and documentary films in the 21st century, including Bee Movie, Spirited Away, Chicken Run, 13th, Children of Men, In Time, and others.

As the purpose of ENG 106 at the University of Miami is to prepare students to enter the academic community of the university through writing, students will be required to read, interpret, research, contextualize, and write about the works introduced in the course. Students will be introduced to primary and secondary research strategies, argumentation and contextualization, and citation styles required of all successful researchers. All of these skills will pertain to the central theme of the course, in this case Marxism.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course, students will exhibit the ability to

  • Demonstrate effective written communication skills in relation to specific rhetorical tasks.
  • Construct original, well-reasoned arguments using a range of materials
  • Find, evaluate, integrate, and synthesize appropriate and relevant primary and secondary sources in their writing
  • Engage in close-reading of texts
  • Cite sources formally (using MLA, APA, Chicago, or other citation formats)

Required Materials

  • Regular access to a computerandportable storage (flash drive, email, cloud, etc)
  • Access to Netflix streaming services and YouTube
  • Most texts will be provided on Google Drive and linked on the schedule section of this document. You will be expected to print and bring these to class or have full access to them during class. As far as textbooks for this class are concerned, there are two required purchases. All others will be shared via PDF.

The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality by Bhaskar Sunkara (2020 Edition)
AbeBooks
Bookshop
Amazon

Why Marx Was Right by Terry Eagleton (2018 Edition)
Yale University Press
Bookshop
Amazon

Policies & Assignments

Participation
Students are required to attend class, come to class on time and prepared (having done the reading/s or assignment/s), at least attempt all classwork activities, turn in assigned work when due, participate fully in good faith in any peer work, participate in class discussion, focus on the work at hand, and conduct oneself in a manner appropriate to the college classroom.

Rubric for class participation

5Student is always attentive and contributes relevant insight very often, completing all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
4Student is attentive and completes all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
3Student is distracted but completes all in-class assignments
2Student is often distracted and off-task, hesitant and unreceptive to collaboration
1Student does not complete in-class assignments
0Student is absent

On Writing and Reading
This class will ask a lot of you in terms of writing and reading. You are likely to do more reading in a quicker time in this course than any other course you have taken before. I will, before class, ask that you respond to several informal prompts on Blackboard in the hopes you will at least attempt to do this work. Homework is a small part of your participation grade but will be immensely helpful to you in thinking about the texts we are discussing and formulating a topic for your final paper. I understand this is not your only class and I respect that you have a personal life beyond our classroom. Nonetheless, I expect you will come to class having at least attempted to do the assigned reading and writing all the way through and having prepared notes, ideas, or questions to discuss with the class.

Revision is a central and integral part of this course and any writing course of merit. In order for your writing to be consistently improving, you must bring it through multiple drafts of revision. Revision, then, is a requirement of this course. You will upload free-write, journaling, even outlines and sketches, to your Google Drive folder. Failure to do so will cast a burden of proof on your having done consistent revision in good faith for each assignment, and this will be reflected in your grades.

Attendance
Each student is allotted 4 unexcused absences (two whole weeks) and 3 tardies. Absences beyond this may result in deductions from the student’s final grade. Excessive absences will result in the student failing the course. After a student has been late (tardy) 3 times, each following time the student is late will result in 1/3 an absence. This means once a student has been late to class 6 times, they will receive an absence. Students who are consistently distracted in class (texting, browsing the internet, etc.) will be warned to pay closer attention to class. After this warning, if a student is continuously distracted in class, they will be marked absent. Students who acknowledge holy days on the same day(s) we have class will be excused if they have alerted the professor of all of these by the end of three days after you are enrolled in class. Absences do not excuse any due dates or work missed.

Electronics Policy and Google Drive vs. Blackboard
Each student is required to bring tablet, laptop, or similar electronic device to class in order to take notes, complete and submit in-class writing assignments, access readings or notes for class discussion, and participate in peer review. No electronic device should be a distraction from the activities of the classroom for any student. The use of laptops or tablets is allowed only to complete classroom-related activities. If electronic devices become a distraction or a means by which students avoid class participation, the student(s) in violation will receive an absence for class that day.

We will spend most of our class time working in Google Drive, a cloud-based file sharing system to which each student at the University of Miami has access. To log-in to your Google Drive, visit google.miami.edu and use the same credentials you use to access your email, Canelink, and Blackboard interfaces. You will have your own folder within the classroom’s folder (“ENG 106 S20”). Drive is where you will submit your drafts, revisions, in-class writing assignments, reflections, and peer reviews. The only thing you will not submit to this folder is your final draft to each assignment, which must be uploaded to Blackboard. It is up to you to make sure you have access to your Blackboard and Google Drive accounts and folders at all times. Inability to access Google Drive or Blackboard will not be sufficient excuse for not turning in assignments on time. For IT help, UMIT is located on the third floor of the Richter Library.

 Academic Honor Code
As a student of the University of Miami, you have agreed to uphold the Honor Code. Violation of this code includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, or academic dishonesty. The Undergraduate Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook defines each of these violations:

Cheating – Implies the intent to deceive. It includes all actions, devices and deceptions used in the attempt to commit this act. Examples include, but are not limited to, copying answers from another student’s exam, and using a cheat sheet or crib notes in an exam.

Plagiarism – is representing the words or ideas of someone else as your own. Examples include, but are not limited to, failing to properly cite direct quotes and failing to give credit for someone else’s ideas.

Collusion – is the act of working together on an academic undertaking for which a student is individually responsible. Examples include, but are not limited to, sharing information in labs that are to be done individually.

Academic Dishonesty – includes any other act not specifically covered that compromises the integrity of a student or intrudes, violates, or disturbs the academic environment of the university community. Examples are attempting or agreeing to commit, or assisting in or facilitating the commission of, any scholastic dishonesty violation, failing to appear or testify without good cause when requested by the Honor Council, failing to keep information about cases confidential, supplying false information to the Honor Council and accusing a student of a violation of this Code in bad faith.

Title II, B

Any student who violates the Honor Code will fail not only the assignment but the entire course. Each of you has the ability to think through your own unique ideas. If you are thinking of violating the Honor Code because you are overwhelmed or in distress, speak with me and we will come up with a better solution.

On Accessibility and Acceptance
Every student, no matter their identity, ideology, or ability, is welcome and valued in this class. This class will require that we confront political, social, and ideological questions that may be deemed controversial. I encourage you not to shy away from this opportunity to think through these issues. No matter what, no student should ever feel unwelcome or unsafe in this classroom. If you find that you feel inappropriately uncomfortable, consistently unsafe, or need help, please let me know immediately and I will direct you to the resources that may help. The University of Miami Counseling Center (UMCC) provides professional support to students no matter their gender expression, sexual preferences, sex, race, financial or immigration status. You can make an appointment by calling 305-284-5511, by visiting counseling.studentaffairs.miami.edu, or by visiting the counseling center on Merrick Dr. (across from the Pavia Garage).

Students with accessibility requirements are provided for by the University of Miami’s Office of Disability Services (ODS) and may contact this office at 305-284-2374 or disabilityservices@miami.edu to make any requests for accessibility. If you have trouble contacting the ODS, let me know and I will help you. If you have contacted the ODS and have any requirements of me, please be sure to let me know as soon as possible.

Turning in assignments 
Papers should be submitted on Blackboard or Google Drive on the day and at the specified time they are due. Each day a paper is late, there will be a deduction of 10% from the grade. All assignments are assigned in due time to be completed by each student on time. It is your own job to make sure you do not forget deadlines and that you turn your assignments into the correct platform (Blackboard, email, or Google Drive). Every deadline is listed on this document in the schedule section, on the assignment sheets themselves, and verbally said in class. If you require an extension(s) for your assignment(s), you must request them of the instructor at least three class periods (over a week) prior to the due date of the assignment. Under no circumstances is the instructor required to grant you an extension(s). No late blackboard posts will be accepted.

The Writing Center (www.as.miami.edu/writingcenter) can help you at any stage of the writing process.  Appointments are suggested, but they also accept ‘walk-in’ visits.  If I think it’s necessary, I will ask you to use the Writing Center on a regular basis. Please note that all appointments are currently being held online until further notice.  To make an online appointment, make an account at the above link/sign in as usual and choose an available time.

OWL @ Purdue is a great online resource for writing and research techniques. It can be located at https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html.

Extra Credit is not available or permitted in this course. I do not allow extra credit for several reasons: put simply, it is unfair to those who have committed to the work required of this class if others are able to do extra work for credit. Moreover, extra credit requires extra effort and time to which I am unable to commit for reading, annotating, grading, and categorizing within the gradebook.

On Communication
I will make a point to learn each of your names and I expect you will learn to use one another’s name in conversation, as well (“I agree with what ___ said”). This will create a welcoming and meaningful culture for our classroom. If you have a question about the policies or assignments for this class, you may speak to me before, during, or after class, via email, or in office hours. I will make a point to reply to your email within 24-to-48 hours. If you have not received a response from me after two days, you should email me again. Please do not email me to ask questions about an assignment one or two days before it is due as this will not allow due time for me to respond and for you to use this answer in writing your assignment.

Grades
If you have a question or concern about an assignment or participation grade, please come and see me during my office hours or talk with me before or after class to arrange a meeting.  Due to federal requirements, UM faculty are not permitted to discuss grades via email or phone, so we will need to meet in person and in private.

Overall Grade Distribution:

Attendance10%
Blackboard Posts/Class Participation15%
Quizzes10%
Reading Annotations15%
Annotated Bibliography20%
Research Essay15%
Lensing Assignment15%
Total100%


Grading Scale:

A940-1000
A-900-939
B+870-899
B830-869
B-800-829
C+770-799
C730-769
C-700-729
D+670-699
D600-669
F0-599
A – Exemplary B – Effective C – Sufficient   D – Unsatisfactory F – Failure

Assignments

  • Assignment Title: Blackboard Discussion Board Posts

Assignment Directions: Most days, you will have a discussion board post due on Blackboard that asks you to think through something we discussed in-class and/or a reading we have done. Sometimes, these responses will ask you to create a scholarly question for the class. A good example of a scholarly question takes a quotation from the text and then expands upon that in order to pose a new question that the text does not itself consider.

In-class or Out-of-Class: Out of class

Due Date: All posts are due before class time.

Requirements: 150-250 words ea. To earn full points on your reading responses, you will need to write thoughtful answers in full sentences and/or paragraphs and submit your post before class time.

Objective: These responses are designed to stimulate your thinking about a text and/or the course themes and help prepare you for class discussion. They are also great places to start generating ideas for your other written assignments. These posts will be graded based on completion, but thoughtful responses will enrich our class discussions and help you develop confidence in your ideas, critical reading skills, and writing.

  • Assignment Title: Through-line Thursdays (TLT)

Assignment Directions: On most Thursdays, we will have ‘Through-line Thursday’ where you and a partner will connect a minimum of two and a maximum of four sources, one of which must include the reading for that Thursday. The other sources could be something we have previously discussed in this course or something you read, saw, heard outside of class.

In-Class or Out-of-Class: In-class

Due Date: Most Thursdays

Requirements: 250-350 words ea.These assignments are written in groups and while quotations will be helpful to make your connections between sources, this must be original work so most of the writing should be that of yourself and your group member(s).

Objective: The point of this assignment is to practice making connections between different texts, a skill you will be required to showcase courses beyond this one. Whereas the Blackboard reading responses test comprehension (that you understand what we read/talked about), these in-class writing responses will test argumentation (that you have thoughts about what you’ve read).

  • Assignment Title: Quizzes

Assignment Directions: Throughout the semester, we may have brief quizzes on common grammatical mistakes, citation formatting, and comprehension of reading assignments. All of these will be reviewed ahead of time and all will be open-notes, so you should not stress about these. However, because you will only be allotted a certain amount of time to complete these quizzes, you should still familiarize yourself with the material before the day of the quiz. To access terminology for the course go to this Quizlet deck: https://quizlet.com/_981jz7?x=1jqt&i=3edmtt.

In-Class or Out-of-Class: In-class

Due Date: All will be announced ahead of time (and on Syllabus)

Requirements: Answer questions in under 30 minutes.

Objective: The point of this assignment is to help students classify different types of citation styles quickly and to test comprehension of theoretical knowledge from readings. Quizzing is a tool that trains students to access knowledge quickly, ‘on-the-fly’, which is an important skill in academic settings and will prepare students for interrogating complex academic writing.

Assignment Directions: This project asks each student to annotate readings and post questions about the readings. This is an on-going assignment throughout the first half of the semester—you have until October 1 to complete 1000 words of annotations and log them onto your annotation sheet that you turn in. The instructor will explain how to do this logging; however, the annotation that you do should be fairly simple. For each reading, the link will take you to a PDF in Google Drive. Highlighting certain words and phrases will result in a comment button appearing next to where you have highlighted words. You can annotate by clicking on this “Add Comment” button.

In-Class or Out-of-Class: Out of class

Due Date: October 1st

Requirements: 1000 words in total (all annotations combined)

Objective: The purpose of this assignment is to practice annotating scholarly readings, especially those with complex topics that introduce controversial cultural issues and questions. Annotating allows us to deal with our initial reactions to the text and pose questions to what we are reading. In general, annotations should be bridging the content to our thoughts in the same way Blackboard posts allow us to flesh through our thoughts more thoroughly.

Assignment Directions: This assignment will act as Part 1 of your research project. After selecting a topic for your project, you will conduct research and provide an overview of the existing body of research on the topic—trace the different schools of thought or approaches to the topic, summarize what other scholars have said, and examine how they agree, disagree, and relate to each other. This is, in short, a report on all of the relevant, recent scholarship about a given topic (or as much as you can find). Think of this as if you are stepping into the ongoing scholarly conversation about your topic and your goal is to outline each of the strands of that conversation.

In-Class or Out-of-Class: Out of class (peer review in-class)

Due Date: November 3rd before 3pm

Requirements: Minimum of 10 peer-reviewed sources; 1500 words

Objective: This performance of research and abridging arguments of other scholars is an important part of recognizing there is an ongoing interest in the topic you are researching and it will be very important to do as you continue in your academic career. The annotated bibliography will help you situate your own argument (that of your research paper) within the existing scholarly research. Aspects of this will become crucial during your research paper since you will need to reference sources in this list in your paper. Therefore, as you are researching, you would be wise to think about what others are not saying so that you can provide the missing link.

Assignment Directions: You will produce a research paper in a scholarly format on a topic of your interest that relates to our focus of study: Marxism in America. I encourage you to think about topics addressed by your area of study. This is not a report or summary of different sources (which is called a literature review). Though you will use your annotated bibliography to situate your own argument, the majority of your paper should be dedicated to developing your own argument and situating your own contribution to (or criticism of) the arguments of others. Your argument does not necessarily need to be complex or challenge the very definition of established theoretical knowledge. However, you ought to consider what seems to you to be left out of a lot of the sources you encounter and then make an argument for fixing this lapse.

In-class or Out-of-class: Out of class (one-page paper and peer review in-class)

Due Date: November 29th before midnight

Requirements: Your essay must use research from scholarly sources (minimum of 7 peer-reviewed sources), put forward a clear and convincing position on your topic, and follow a single citation style, format, and set of conventions (MLA, Chicago, or APA). Your essay should be 1500 words minimum.

Objective: The purpose of this assignment is not only to show again your ability to condense complex scholarly knowledge into your own words, but also to show that you can use this knowledge to make an argument of your own. Argumentation is one of the major abilities of all strong academics. In addition, strong academic writers are able to condense information efficiently and in order to contribute to a larger goal (an argument).

Assignment Directions: This assignment asks you to use a theoretical or conceptual text as a framework to read a primary text, such as a creative or fictional work. One way to approach this is to imagine yourself as the author of the theoretical text and respond to the second text from their perspective. Therefore, the goal of this assignment is to use the concepts and ideas of the theoretical text as a “lens” to evaluate and interpret the cultural text.

In-class or out-of-class: Out of class (one-page paper and peer review in-class)

Due Date: December 17th before midnight

Requirements: Your paper may be given in multimodal form (with graphics, animations, etc.) or in a traditional written format. Your essay should be 1250 words minimum.

Objective: All ENG 106 students are required to do this assignment for the very reason that it requires complex thinking to explain a theoretical concept or set of theoretical concepts and then apply these to a given context. It is called a lens assignment because you are using the theoretical concepts as a lens to understand or critique an object of study.

Schedule*

Week 1

T   8/24                  PPT for reviewing Syllabus, Drive, Topic

Scholarly Questions

(If time permits) “What is an argument?” assignment

Homework: Read through syllabus to prepare for open-notes quiz, discussion board post on “Propaganda of History” from W.E.B. DuBois’s Black Reconstruction in America; Watch Chicken Run on Hulu or Spirited Away on HBO Max

R   8/26                 Quiz #1 on the Syllabus

Discuss Reading Annotations assignment

DuBois on History

Karl Marx and the Commodity

Homework: Watch The Ultimate Guide to the Presidents: Reconstruction and the Gilded Age (1865 -1901) | History” on YouTube; Read from Kathleen Sears, Socialism 101 p. 1-32; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

Week 2

T   8/31                  Discuss close-reading

                                    Basics of Socialism, Marxism

                                    Ch. 1 of The Gilded Age from PBS and “Gilded Age Politics” from CrashCourse

Homework: Read from Kathleen Sears, Socialism 101 p. 33-47 & listen to RevLeft Radio ep. From Oct 11 2020 or ep. from Sep 22 2017; discussion board post

**Wed, 9/1         Last Day to Register for a Course**

R   9/2                    Christian Socialism, Liberation Theology, and Associationism

                                    Review citation styles: MLA, APA, Chicago

Homework: Read from Bhaskar Sunkara, The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality, Ch. 2:  “Gravediggers”; listen to RevLeft Radio ep. From Oct 1 2020; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

Week 3

T   9/7                     Marx and Engels: Historical Materialism, Dialectics

Homework: Read from Michael Harrington, Socialism: Past and Future, Ch. 2: “Socialisms”; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

**Wed, 9/8         Last Day to Drop a Course without a ‘W’**

R   9/9                    Grammar I

                                    Socialisms

Homework: Read from Tony Michels, Jewish Radicals: A Documentary History p. 41-69, 93-94, 97-98, 104-108; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

Week 4

T   9/14                  Jewish Radicalism & the Socialist Party

Guest Talk on Radical Periodicals at the Turn of the Century, John Funchion (Associate Professor of English at University of Miami)

Homework: Read from Bhaskar Sunkara, The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality, Ch. 3:  “The Future We Lost”; discussion board post

R   9/16                 Quiz #2

                                    Continental Socialism After Marx

Homework: Read from Bhaskar Sunkara, The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality, Ch. 7:  “Socialism and America”; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

Week 5

T   9/21                  The Short Long History of Socialism in America

Homework: Read from Robin D.G. Kelley, Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression, Ch. 4; “In the Heart of the Trouble: Race, Sex, and the ILD” and “The Black Bolsheviks” in Socialist Worker; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

R   9/23                 Black Bolshevism

Homework: Read from Robin D.G. Kelley, Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression, Ch. 5: “Negroes Ain’ Black-But Red!: Black Communists and the Culture of Opposition”; discussion board post // Reminder: Reading Annotations log due before 11:59pm on 10/1

Week 6

T   9/28                  Grammar II

                                    Black Communism in the South, cont’d

                                    Review Annotated Bibliography assignment

Homework: Read Read from Angela Davis, Women, Race & Class ch. 10 and Claudia Jones, “An end to the neglect of the problems of the Negro woman!” & “We Seek Full Equality for Women”; discussion board post

R   9/30                 Close-Read Prologue of ZAMI

Communist Women

Homework: Read from Michael Harrington, Socialism: Past and Future, Ch. 3: “Authoritarian Collectivisms”; discussion board post

Week 7

T   10/5                  Quiz #3

                                    Authoritarianism

Homework: Read from Michael Harrington, Socialism: Past and Future, Ch. 4: “The Realpolitik of Utopia”; Watch The Trial of the Chicago 7 on Netflix; discussion board post

R   10/7                 The New Left

Homework: Read Ch. 3 from Assata Shakur, Assata: An Autobiography; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

Week 8

T   10/12              Midterm Reflections

Black Radicalism in the 1970s-1980s: George Jackson, Angela Davis, and Assata Shakur

Homework: Read 2 letters from Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson p. 3-31 and Ch. 11 from Assata Shakur, Assata: An Autobiography; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

R   10/14              ** No Class – Fall Break**

Week 9

T   10/19              2 Letters by George L. Jackson

                                    Angela Y. Davis and the Era of Mass Incarceration

Homework: Read from The Huey P. Newton Reader p. 160-179 and at least 3 sections from the following; discussion board post

  1. From “In Defense of Self-Defense” I: June 20, 1967 (p. 134-137)
  2. From “In Defense of Self-Defense” II: July 3, 1967 (p. 138-141)
  3. The Correct Handling of a Revolution: July 20, 1967 (p. 142-146)
  4. A Functional Definition of Politics, January 17, 1969 (p. 147-149)
  5. The Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements: August 15, 1970 (p. 157-159)
  6. Uniting Against a Common Enemy: October 23, 1971 (p. 234-240)
  7. On Pan-Africanism or Communism: December 1, 1972 (p. 248-255)

Recommended/Further Reading:

  • Introduction to The Huey P. Newton Reader by David Hilliard
  • “On the Peace Movement: August 15, 1969” from The Huey P. Newton Reader (p. 150-153)
  • “Black Capitalism Re-analyzed I: June 5, 1971” from The Huey P. Newton Reader (p. 227-233)
  • Listen to RevLeft Radio ep. from Feb 24 2019
  • Listen to RevLeftRadio ep. from Jan 22 2018

R   10/21              Huey P. Newton and the BPP

Homework: Read from Michael Harrington, Socialism: Past and Future, Ch. 5: “The End of Socialism?”; Discussion board post; Prepare draft of Annotated Bibliography before class for in-class workshop.

See sample annotated bibliography here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1l6jV89vsCOnonOzeTOpCsca5evblQVUi/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=108543512564414456597&rtpof=true&sd=true.

Week 10

T   10/26              Annotated Bibliography workshop

Homework: Read from Michael Harrington, Socialism: Past and Future, Ch. 6: “The Third Creation of the World”; Listen to “Capitalism: What Makes Us Free?” from Throughline podcast; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

R   10/28              Review Research Essay assignment

Cultural Studies and the Long 1980s

Homework: Read “Introduction: Queer of Color Critique, Historical Materialism, and Canonical Sociology” from Aberrations in Black: Toward a Queer of Color Critique by Roderick A. Ferguson; discussion board post; Annotated Bibliography due in your personal folder (Last Name, First Name) no later than Wed Nov. 3 at 3pm EST

Week 11

T   11/2                  Black Queer Marxism

Homework: Read the Introduction “The Old History of Capitalism” of Histories of Racial Capitalism, edited by Destin Jenkins and Justin Leroy; Listen to RevLeft Radio ep. from Oct 23 2017 or RevLeft ep. from Feb 14 2018; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

R   11/4                 Racial Capitalism

Geographies of Racial Capitalism (Short Documentary)

Homework: Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Preface of Second Edition, Original Preface and Ch. 1-2; discussion board post; watch Bee Movie on Netflix

Week 12

T   11/9                  Grammar III

Eagleton Preface i, ii and Ch. 1-2

Homework: Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Ch. 3 and watch In Time (2011) – links below

iTunes                    Google Play                           Amazon                                   YouTube Movies

R   11/11              Ch. 3 of Eagleton

In Time

Homework: Watch Children of Men (2006) on Peacock for free, or rent on other platform; Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Ch. 4; discussion board post

Week 13

T   11/16              Ch. 4 Eagleton

                                    Children of Men

Homework: Watch 13th on Netflix; discussion board post; Prepare draft for research essay workshop

R   11/18              Review Lensing Assignment, 13th

Research Essay Workshop

Homework: Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Ch. 7-9 and watch Capital in the Twenty-First Century on Netflix; discussion board post; Research essay due Sun., 11/29 at 11:59pm

**Thanksgiving Break: 11/20–11/28**

Week 14

T   11/30              Ch. 7-9 Eagleton

Capital in the Twenty-First Century         

Homework: Read from Bhaskar Sunkara, The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality, Ch. 1 “A Day in the Life of a Socialist” and watch Saving Capitalism on Netflix; discussion board post

R   12/2                 Ch. 9 of Eagleton

Homework: Read from Bhaskar Sunkara, The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality, Ch. 8 “Return of the Mack” and watch Requiem for the American Dream on YouTube; discussion board post

Week 15

T   12/7                  Return of the Mack

                                    “How We Win” Group Activity

Final Reflections

Homework: Draft of Lensing Assignment due no later than Monday, May 3rd in order to receive comments from professor

**Lensing Assignment due no later than December 17 at 11:59 p.m.**

*Course schedule is fluid and may require alterations throughout the semester depending on different, unforeseen events or complications. All changes will be announced both in class and via Blackboard/email announcements in due time for students to receive and adjust their plans accordingly.

Introduction to Latin American Studies

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI). Fall 1. 2021

Course Title: “Introduction to Latin American Studies”
Duration: 12 Weeks
Course: Fall 1 and 2 of 2021
Dates: Sept 3-Dec 10, 2021 (with break Oct 9-24)
Time: Fridays 3:00pm-4:45pm

Course Description:
Latin American Studies critically analyzes the conceptual boundaries of what Latin America is, who Latin America represents, and how this all came to be. A multi-disciplinary field, Latin American Studies combines international relations, policy and law, cultural studies, history, and literary studies. This course will outline many of the theoretical currents of Latin American Studies as a discipline. We will begin by asking the question “What is Latin America?” which is to say, “how did Latin America become Latin America?” We will then piece together the discipline, including approaches in LAS to visual and literary arts, sexuality and gender, colonialism and history, and finally end with contemporary field approaches.

Suggested purchase:

  • The Companion to Latin American Studies (2003), ed. by Philip Swanson
  • New Approaches to Latin American Studies: Culture and Power (2018), ed. by Juan Poblete

Schedule

(readings are meant to be done before the class during which they will be discussed)

Sept 3 – What is Latin American Studies (LAS)?: Disciplinary Introduction, History, and Concerns

Sept 10 – The Colonial Era: Contact to 1800 

Sept 17– The Caudillo Era: 1800-1900 

Sept 24 – Nationalism and the Afterlives of Colonial Violence

Oct 1 – LAS Approaches to the Caribbean

Oct 8 – LAS Approaches to Literary and Visual Arts 

Fall Break: October 9-24

Oct 29 – Race & Indigeneity in LAS

Reading:

  • “Intimacy and Empire: Indian-African Interaction in Spanish Colonial New Mexico, 1500-1800.(Indian-Black Relations in Historical and Anthropological Perspective” by Dedra S. McDonald. The American Indian Quarterly 22, no. 1-2 (January 1, 1998): 143–156.
  • “A Non‐essentialist Theory of Race: The Case of an Afro‐indigenous Village in Northern Peru” by Tamara Hale. Social Anthropology 23, no. 2 (May 2015): 135–151.
  • “Who Is Black, White, or Mixed Race? How Skin Color, Status, and Nation Shape Racial Classification in Latin America” by Edward Telles and Tianna Paschel. American Journal of Sociology 120, no. 3 (November 1, 2014): 864–907.
  • “Race, culture, and history: Charles Wagley and the anthropology of the African Diaspora in the Americas” by Fred Hay. Boletim do Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. Ciências humanas, 2014-12, Vol.9 (3), p.695-705.

Nov 12 – Afro-Diasporic Religions in the Caribbean 

Reading:

  • “Of Ghosts and Shadows” and “There is no E in Zombi, Which Means There Can Be No You or We” from Ayiti (2011) by Roxane Gay
  • Introduction & Ch. 1 of Queering Black Atlantic Religions (2019) by Roberto Strongman
  • “On the Materiality of Black Atlantic Rituals” in Materialities of Ritual in the Black Atlantic (2014), ed. by Akinwumi Ogundiran, and Paula Saunders
  • “Ritual Life of an Altar-Home A Photographic Essay on Transformational Places and Technologies” by Raquel Romberg. Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft, vol. 13, no. 2, (Summer 2018)
  • “‘Maricón,’ ‘Pájaro,’ and ‘Loca’: Cuban and Puerto Rican Linguistic Practices, and Sexual Minority Participation, in U.S. Santería” by Salvador Vidal-Ortiz. Journal of Homosexuality, vol. 58 (2011)

Nov 19– U.S. Imperialism and Hegemony in Latin America 

Reading:

  • “Inverse Coloniality” from Imperialism and theWiderAtlantic: Essays on theAesthetics, Literature, and Politics of Transatlantic Cultures (2017), ed. Tania Gentic, and Francisco LaRubia-Prado
  • Passages from The Ideology of Creole Revolution: Imperialism and Independence in American and Latin American Political Thought, Joshua Simon
  • “Denaturalizing the Monroe Doctrine: The rise of Latin American legal anti-imperialism in the face of the modern US and hemispheric redefinition of the Monroe Doctrine” (2020) by Juan Pablo Scarf
  • “The Negative Effects of U.S. Imperialism in Central America” by Michael Hendricks

Dec 3 – The Subaltern: Hegemony, Cultural Studies, and Decoloniality

Reading:

  • “Coloniality and Modernity/Rationality” by Aníbal Quijano
  • “Can the Subaltern Speak? (abridged)” by Gayatri Spivak
  • “Moving from Subalternity: Indigenous Women in Guatemala and Mexico” by Jean Franco
  • “The Roads to the Future: Rewesternization, Dewesternization, and Decoloniality” by Walter Mignolo

Dec 10 – LAS Approaches: Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Reading:

  • “Turning to Feminisms” by Sonia E. Alvarez and Claudia de Lima Costa in New Approaches to Latin American Studies: Culture and Power
  • “The Gender and Sexuality Turn” by Robert McKee Irwin and Mónica Szurmuk in New Approaches to Latin American Studies: Culture and Power
  • “The Subalternist Turn” by Gareth Williams in New Approaches to Latin American Studies: Culture and Power

Dec 17 – LAS Approaches: Affect and Post-Hegemony 

Reading:

  • “Racializing Affect” by Ulla D. Berg and Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas
  • “Civil Society, Consumption, and Governmentality in an Age of Global Restructuring” An Introduction by George Yúdice (Professor at UM)
  • The Affect Turn and Post-Hegemony chapters from the New Approaches in Latin American Studies: Culture and Power anthology (2018)
  • “Affect, Bodies, and Circulations in Contemporary Latin American Film” by Vinodh Venkatesh and María del Carmen Caña Jiménez

Queer Pop Culture

ENG 106. Fall 2021. University of Miami

Readings (Requires UMiami authentication)

Navigation:

Course: ENG 106
Institution: University of Miami
Course Location:
Course Time:

Course Credit hours: 3                                                    
Instructor: Preston Taylor Stone
Email: ptstone@miami.edu
Office Hours: By appointment (Virtual)

Course Description:

The University of Miami’s English Composition program has two required introductory writing courses: ENG 105 and ENG 106. Both courses are largely skills-based classes. In ENG 105, students learn inquiry and argumentation. In ENG 105, students continue to develop argumentation strategies and incorporate academic research and interpretation techniques. In this course section of ENG 106, we will focus these skills on a centering topic: queer studies. Developing after the institutionalization of LGBT Studies, queer studies comes to us from a variety of places: rejection of identity politics as liberal fantasy, embrace of solidarity, and on-the-ground activism. In this course, we will begin by asking What was queer studies?, a question of history. Reading important pieces of theory from the late 1990s and the 2000s, we will then turn to different cultural texts, including films, songs, music videos, poems, and television. Finally, we will ask the question What is queer culture? and develop a theoretical and cultural lexicon and network of queer culture.

In order to develop the skills of close-reading, research and annotation, interpretation, and citation, this course will use queer theoretical texts and cultural texts. Throughout the course, we will have in-class and online discussions about the social legibility of gender, sexuality, race, and class as well as the project of justice and solidarity. Those who are interested in LGBTQ studies or culture and those who are within the following disciplines/majors are strongly encouraged to join: gender and sexuality studies, English, sociology, anthropology, sociology, political science, modern languages and literatures, American studies, Africana studies, history, philosophy, psychology, art, theatre arts, cinematic arts, communication studies, pre-law, journalism, and music.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course, students will exhibit the ability to

  • Demonstrate effective written communication skills in relation to specific rhetorical tasks.
  • Construct original, well-reasoned arguments using a range of materials
  • Find, evaluate, integrate, and synthesize appropriate and relevant primary and secondary sources in their writing
  • Engage in close-reading of texts
  • Cite sources formally (using MLA, APA, Chicago, or other citation formats)

Required Texts and Materials:

  • Regular access to a computer
  • Portable storage (flash drive, email, cloud, etc)
  • Most texts will be provided on Google Drive and linked on the schedule section of this document. You will be expected to print and bring these to class or have full access to them during class. The text that will not be provided via PDF will be required purchases for students. These required purchases is listed below:

Queer Theory Now: From Foundations to Future by Hannah McCann & Whitney Monaghan

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

IndieBound

Policies & Assignments

Participation
Students are required to attend class, come to class on time and prepared (having done the reading/s or assignment/s), at least attempt all classwork activities, turn in assigned work when due, participate fully in good faith in any peer work, participate in class discussion, focus on the work at hand, and conduct oneself in a manner appropriate to the college classroom.

Rubric for class participation

5Student is always attentive and contributes relevant insight very often, completing all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
4Student is attentive and completes all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
3Student is distracted but completes all in-class assignments
2Student is often distracted and off-task, hesitant and unreceptive to collaboration
1Student does not complete in-class assignments
0Student is absent

Face coverings are mandatory at all times (with the exception of when drinking water) while in on-campus class sessions. Failure to follow this requirement is grounds for disciplinary action and may lead to removal from the classroom and/or the course.

The seat you select on the first day of class must be from among those identified as meeting the physical distance requirements for COVID-19; this seat will be your assigned seat for the remainder of the semester. This will enable the most effective COVID-19 contact tracing, should it be required.

Students are required to use the Daily Symptom Checker and be cleared to attend class each day. Students may be asked to show the green “Good to Go” notice. You may be required to produce your notice at any time while on campus. Students who fail to comply or to produce their “Good to Go” notice will be asked to leave the classroom.

AttendanceRubric (click here)
Each student is allotted 5 unexcused absences (one and a half weeks) and 3 tardies. Absences beyond this may result in deductions from the student’s final grade. Excessive absences will result in the student failing the course. After a student has been late (tardy) 3 times, each following time the student is late will result in 1/3 an absence. This means once a student has been late to class 6 times, they will receive an absence. Students who are consistently distracted in class (texting, browsing the internet, etc.) will be warned to pay closer attention to class. After this warning, if a student is continuously distracted in class, they will be marked absent. Students who acknowledge holy days on the same day(s) we have class will be excused if they have alerted the professor of all of these by the end of three days after you are enrolled in class. Absences do not excuse any due dates or work missed.

Unless you are approved to take this course under the Remote Learning Option, physical attendance in the classroom is required as scheduled. You are expected to participate with your video enabled during your non-classroom days. If at some point in the semester you cannot physically attend class sessions due to illness, injury, or other approved absence, you must contact the instructor for permission to temporarily attend the course online. Unexcused absences from the classroom may affect your grade or lead to failing the course.

On Writing and Reading
This class will ask a lot of you in terms of writing and reading. You are likely to do more reading in a quicker time in this course than any other course you have taken before. I will, before class, ask that you respond to several informal prompts on Blackboard in the hopes you will at least attempt to do this work. Homework is a small part of your participation grade but will be immensely helpful to you in thinking about the texts we are discussing and formulating a topic for your final paper. I understand this is not your only class and I respect that you have a personal life beyond our classroom. Nonetheless, I expect you will come to class having at least attempted to do the assigned reading and writing all the way through and having prepared notes, ideas, or questions to discuss with the class.

Revision is a central and integral part of this course and any writing course of merit. In order for your writing to be consistently improving, you must bring it through multiple drafts of revision. Revision, then, is a requirement of this course. You will upload free-write, journaling, even outlines and sketches, to your Google Drive folder. Failure to do so will cast a burden of proof on your having done consistent revision in good faith for each assignment, and this will be reflected in your grades.

Electronics Policy and Google Drive vs. Blackboard
Each student is required to bring a tablet, laptop, or similar electronic device to class in order to take notes, complete and submit in-class writing assignments, access readings or notes for class discussion, and participate in peer review. No electronic device should be a distraction from the activities of the classroom for any student. The use of laptops or tablets is allowed only to complete classroom-related activities. If electronic devices become a distraction or a means by which students avoid class participation, the student(s) in violation will receive an absence for class that day.

We will spend most of our class time working in Google Drive, a cloud-based file sharing system to which each student at the University of Miami has access. To log-in to your Google Drive, visit google.miami.edu and use the same credentials you use to access your email, Canelink, and Blackboard interfaces. You will have your own folder within the classroom’s folder (“ENG 105 D3 – Fall 2020”). Drive is where you will submit your drafts, revisions, in-class writing assignments, reflections, and peer reviews. It is up to you to make sure you have access to your Blackboard and Google Drive accounts and folders at all times. Inability to access Google Drive or Blackboard will not be sufficient excuse for not turning in assignments on time. For IT help, UMIT is located on the third floor of the Richter Library or may be accessed at it.miami.edu.

Students are expressly prohibited from recording any part of this course. Meetings of this course might be recorded by the University. Any recordings will be available to students registered for this class as they are intended to supplement the classroom experience. Students are expected to follow appropriate University policies and maintain the security of passwords used to access recorded lectures. Recordings may not be reproduced, shared with those not in the class, or uploaded to other online environments. If the instructor or a University of Miami office plans any other uses for the recordings, beyond this class, students identifiable in the recordings will be notified to request consent prior to such use. This instructor is the copyright owner of the courseware; individual recordings of the materials on Blackboard and/or of the virtual sessions are not allowed. Such materials cannot be shared outside the physical or virtual classroom environment without express permission.

 Academic Honor Code
As a student of the University of Miami, you have agreed to uphold the Honor Code. Violation of this code includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, or academic dishonesty. Title II, B of the Undergraduate Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook defines each of these violations:

Cheating – Implies the intent to deceive. It includes all actions, devices and deceptions used in the attempt to commit this act. Examples include, but are not limited to, copying answers from another student’s exam, and using a cheat sheet or crib notes in an exam.

Plagiarism – is representing the words or ideas of someone else as your own. Examples include, but are not limited to, failing to properly cite direct quotes and failing to give credit for someone else’s ideas.

Collusion – is the act of working together on an academic undertaking for which a student is individually responsible. Examples include, but are not limited to, sharing information in labs that are to be done individually.

Academic Dishonesty – includes any other act not specifically covered that compromises the integrity of a student or intrudes, violates, or disturbs the academic environment of the university community. Examples are attempting or agreeing to commit, or assisting in or facilitating the commission of, any scholastic dishonesty violation, failing to appear or testify without good cause when requested by the Honor Council, failing to keep information about cases confidential, supplying false information to the Honor Council and accusing a student of a violation of this Code in bad faith.

Any student who violates the Honor Code will fail not only the assignment but the entire course. Each of you has the ability to think through your own unique ideas. If you are thinking of violating the Honor Code because you are overwhelmed or in distress, speak with me and we will come up with a better solution.

On Accessibility and Acceptance
Every student, no matter their identity, ideology, or ability, is welcome and valued in this class. This class will require that we confront political, social, and ideological questions that may be deemed controversial. I encourage you not to shy away from this opportunity to think through these issues. No matter what, no student should ever feel unwelcome or unsafe in this classroom. If you find that you feel inappropriately uncomfortable, consistently unsafe, or need help, please let me know immediately and I will direct you to the resources that may help. The University of Miami Counseling Center (UMCC) provides professional support to students no matter their gender expression, sexual preferences, sex, race, financial or immigration status. You can make an appointment by calling 305-284-5511, by visiting counseling.studentaffairs.miami.edu, or by visiting the counseling center on Merrick Dr. (across from the Pavia Garage).

Students with accessibility requirements are provided for by the University of Miami’s Office of Disability Services (ODS) and may contact this office at 305-284-2374 or disabilityservices@miami.edu to make any requests for accessibility. If you have trouble contacting the ODS, let me know and I will help you. If you have contacted the ODS and have any requirements of me, please be sure to let me know as soon as possible.

Turning in assignments 
Papers should be submitted on Blackboard or Google Drive on the day and at the specified time they are due. Each day a paper is late, there will be a deduction of 10% from the grade. All assignments are assigned in due time to be completed by each student on time. It is your own job to make sure you do not forget deadlines and that you turn your assignments into the correct platform (Blackboard, email, or Google Drive). Every deadline is listed on this document in the schedule section, on the assignment sheets themselves, and verbally said in class. If you require an extension(s) for your assignment(s), you must request them of the instructor at least three class periods (over a week) prior to the due date of the assignment. Under no circumstances is the instructor required to grant you an extension(s). No late blackboard posts will be accepted.

The Writing Center (www.as.miami.edu/writingcenter) can help you at any stage of the writing process.  Appointments are suggested, but they also accept ‘walk-in’ visits.  If I think it’s necessary, I will ask you to use the Writing Center on a regular basis. Please note that all appointments are currently being held online until further notice.  To make an online appointment, make an account at the above link/sign in as usual and choose an available time.

OWL @ Purdue is a great online resource for writing and research techniques. It can be located at https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html.

Extra Credit is not available or permitted in this course. I do not allow extra credit for several reasons: put simply, it is unfair to those who have committed to the work required of this class if others are able to do extra work for credit. Moreover, extra credit requires extra effort and time to which I am unable to commit for reading, annotating, grading, and categorizing within the gradebook.

On Communication
I will make a point to learn each of your names and I expect you will learn to use one another’s name in conversation, as well (“I agree with what ___ said”). This will create a welcoming and meaningful culture for our classroom. If you have a question about the policies or assignments for this class, you may speak to me before, during, or after class, via email, or in office hours. I will make a point to reply to your email within 24-to-48 hours. If you have not received a response from me after two days, you should email me again. Please do not email me to ask questions about an assignment one or two days before it is due as this will not allow due time for me to respond and for you to use this answer in writing your assignment.

Grades
If you have a question or concern about an assignment or participation grade, please come and see me during my office hours or talk with me before or after class to arrange a meeting.  Due to federal requirements, UM faculty are not permitted to discuss grades via email or phone, so we will need to meet in person and in private.

Overall Grade Distribution:

Attendance/Class participation100pts
Close-reading150pts
Blackboard Posts/Reading Annotations150pts
Comparative Context Analysis project100pts
Literature Review200pts
Research Paper150pts
Lensing Assignment150pts
Total1000pts


Grading Scale:

A940-1000
A-900-939
B+870-899
B830-869
B-800-829
C+770-799
C730-769
C-700-729
D+670-699
D600-669
F0-599
A – Exemplary B – Effective C – Sufficient   D – Unsatisfactory F – Failure

Assignments

Blackboard reading responsesRubric (click here)
The night before most reading assignments are due, you will be asked to respond to a specific prompt or question related to the reading. These responses are designed to stimulate your thinking about the text and the course themes and help prepare you for class discussion. They are also great places to start generating ideas for your essays and research projects. These posts will be graded based on completion, but thoughtful responses will enrich our class discussions and help you develop confidence in your ideas, critical reading skills, and writing. All posts are due before class time. To earn full points on your reading responses, you will need to write thoughtful answers in full sentences and/or paragraphs and submit your post before class time. *200-300 words each*

In-class writing responses
Each Thursday, we will have ‘Through-line Thursday’ where you and a partner will connect a minimum of two and a maximum of four sources, one of which must include the reading for that Thursday. The other sources could be something we have previously discussed in this course or something you read, saw, heard outside of class. The point of this assignment is to practice making connections between different cultural texts, a skill you will be required to showcase in the research paper (discussed below). Whereas the Blackboard reading responses test reading comprehension (that you understand what you read), these in-class writing responses will test argumentation (that you have thoughts about what you’ve read). These assignments are written in groups and while quotations will be helpful to make your connections between sources, this must be original work so the majority of the writing should be that of yourself and your group member(s). These assignments are turned in on Blackboard. *350-500 words each*

Close reading
This brief analysis paper will require you to select a passage from a written text we read in class or another part of digital media (music video, poetry reading, speech, performance art) and examine how the writer/artist uses language and rhetorical strategies. Note that this is not a report on what the author is saying nor is it a summary of the cultural text. While it will be important to understand the cultural text, this assignment is meant to explain how the artist conveys their story or argument (the types of evidence they use, the methods of presenting, the poetic language used, the form of presentation). You may choose to do a close reading of a cultural text (short story, poem, film, mini-series, documentary, music video) or an academic text (peer-reviewed article, monograph chapter). *1000 words min.*

Comparative Context Analysis project
For this assignment, your group will choose a piece from the special collections in the Kislak Center and compare/contrast how this piece has been or might be discussed in three different rhetorical contexts, genres, or academic disciplines. For instance, you might look at the zine The Popstitutes, 86-95: boredom = death and discuss how it might be approached by social sciences, humanities, economics, or healthcare fields and in a popular source such as a magazine, newspaper, or film. You should then use your analysis to make recommendations for writing persuasively in each of these contexts. *group presentation of approx. 20-25 mins*

Annotated BibliographyRubric (click here)
This assignment will act as Part 1 of your research project. After selecting a topic for your project, you will conduct research and provide an overview of the existing body of research on the topic—trace the different schools of thought or approaches to the topic, summarize what other scholars have said, and examine how they agree, disagree, and relate to each other. This is, in short, a report on all of the scholarship about a given topic (or as much as you can find). Think of this as if you are stepping into the ongoing scholarly conversation about your topic and your goal is to outline each of the strands of that conversation. This performance of research and abridging arguments of other scholars is an important part of recognizing there is an ongoing interest in the topic you are researching and it will be very important to do as you continue in your academic career. The annotated bibliography will help you situate your own argument (that of your research paper) within the existing scholarly research. Aspects of this will become crucial during your research paper since you will need to reference sources in this list in your paper. Therefore, as you are researching, you would be wise to think about what others are not saying so that you can provide the missing link. *minimum of 10 peer-reviewed sources*

Research paperRubric (click here)
You will produce a research paper in a scholarly format on a topic of your interest that relates to our focus of study: black feminism. I encourage you to think about topics addressed by your area of study. This is not a report or summary of different sources (literature review). Though you will use your literature review to situate your own argument, the majority of your paper should be dedicated to developing your own argument and situating your own contribution to (or criticism of) the arguments of others. Your essay must use research from scholarly sources (min. of 7 peer-reviewed sources), put forward a clear and convincing position on your topic, and follow a single citation style, format, and set of conventions (MLA, Chicago, or APA). *1500 words min.*

Lensing assignmentRubric (click here)
This assignment asks you to use a theoretical or conceptual text as a framework to read a primary text, such as a creative or fictional work. One way to approach this is to imagine yourself as the author of the theoretical text and respond to the second text from their perspective. Therefore, the goal of this assignment is to use the concepts and ideas of the theoretical text as a “lens” to evaluate and interpret the cultural text. *1500 words min.*

ENG 106 Fall 2021 Course Schedule

(subject to change—any changes will be announced with due notice.  Homework is due for the next class session)

Week 1

T   8/18

R 8/20

Homework:

Homework:

Week 2

T   8/25

R   8/27

Homework:

Homework:

Week 3                                             

 

T   9/1  

                   

R   9/3                     

Homework:

Homework:

Week 4                                              

T   9/8

R   9/10

Homework:

Homework:

Week 5                                              

T   9/15

R   9/17

Homework:

Homework:

Week 6                                              

T   9/22

R   9/24

Homework:

Homework:

Week 7                                              

T   9/29

R   10/1

Homework:

Homework:

Week 8                                              

T   10/6

R   10/8

Homework:

Homework:

Week 9                                              

T   10/13

R   10/15

Homework:

Homework:

Week 10                                            

T   10/20 

R   10/22

Homework:

Homework:

Week 11                                            

T   10/27

R   10/29

Homework:

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Week 12                                            

T   11/3

R   11/5

Homework:

Homework:

Week 13                                            

T   11/10

R   11/12

Homework:

Homework:

Week 14                                            

T   11/17

R   11/19

Homework:

Homework:

Week 15                                            

*

Week 16                                            

**FINAL DRAFT OF LENSING ASSIGNMENT DUE TO GOOGLE DRIVE NO LATER THAN 11:59 P.M. ON **

Marxism in America

ENG 106. Spring 2021. University of Miami

Readings (Requires UMiami authentication)

Navigation:

Course: ENG 106, Sections T2 and U3
Institution: University of Miami
Course Location: Dooly 211
Course Time: T/TH 6:00-7:15pm (T2), T/TH 7:40-8:55pm (U3)
Course Credit hours: 3
Instructor: Preston Taylor Stone
Email: ptstone@miami.edu
Office Hours: By appointment (Virtual)

Course Description:
Contrary to popular belief, socialist ideas are not new to the American political scene. Throughout American history, there have been several left-leaning political movements who found their inspiration from Karl Marx’s writings and the philosophers and political economists who came after calling themselves Marxists. The so-called red scares of American history reveal a concerted effort by government officials and their proxies to stifle left-leaning political movements that would encourage class solidarity or redistribution of wealth in America. Unfortunately, what this has meant is that the majority of people in today’s United States do not have an accurate understanding of Marxism, its philosophy of history or its politics of economy. This course attempts to right this wrong. We will consider the economic, historical, and anthropological as well as sociological inspirations and outcomes in the American political system of Marxist thought. In short, the class will provide students with a deeper understanding of Marx, the Marxist view of history, philosophy, and political economy, and the internationalist and anti-imperialist politics that developed in the United States inspired by Marxist ideologies throughout the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries.

By reading the work of writer-activists like Emma Goldman, Eugene V. Debs, Claudia Jones, Huey P. Newton, George Jackson, Angela Y. Davis and many others, we will connect the theoretical terms Marx and other philosophers developed to different political movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. Finally, we will consider the contemporary moment: what kind of Marxist politics are developing in America in the 21st century? What version of left-leaning politics can exist in the U.S. after the ‘fall’ of communism in the early 1990s? Where and how does Marxism reside in the U.S. today? 

As the purpose of ENG 106 at the University of Miami is to prepare students to enter the academic community of the university through writing, students will be required to read, interpret, research, contextualize, and write about the works introduced in the course. Students will be introduced to primary and secondary research strategies, argumentation and contextualization, and citation styles required of all successful researchers. All of these skills will pertain to the central theme of the course, in this case Marxism.

Course Goals and Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course, students will exhibit the ability to

  • Demonstrate effective written communication skills in relation to specific rhetorical tasks.
  • Construct original, well-reasoned arguments using a range of materials
  • Find, evaluate, integrate, and synthesize appropriate and relevant primary and secondary sources in their writing
  • Engage in close-reading of texts
  • Cite sources formally (using MLA, APA, Chicago, or other citation formats)

Required Materials

  • Regular access to a computer
  • Portable storage (flash drive, email, cloud, etc)
  • Most texts will be provided on Google Drive and linked on the schedule section of this document. You will be expected to print and bring these to class or have full access to them during class.
  • Access to Netflix streaming services and YouTube
  • As far as textbooks for this class are concerned, there are two required purchases. All others will be shared via PDF

Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left by Peter Buhle (2013 Edition)
Verso
Bookshop
Amazon

Why Marx Was Right by Terry Eagleton (2018 Edition)
Yale University Press
Bookshop
Amazon

Policies & Assignments

Participation
Students are required to attend class, come to class on time and prepared (having done the reading/s or assignment/s), at least attempt all classwork activities, turn in assigned work when due, participate fully in good faith in any peer work, participate in class discussion, focus on the work at hand, and conduct oneself in a manner appropriate to the college classroom.

Rubric for class participation

5Student is always attentive and contributes relevant insight very often, completing all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
4Student is attentive and completes all in-class assignments in a collaborative and receptive manner
3Student is distracted but completes all in-class assignments
2Student is often distracted and off-task, hesitant and unreceptive to collaboration
1Student does not complete in-class assignments
0Student is absent

On Writing and Reading
This class will ask a lot of you in terms of writing and reading. You are likely to do more reading in a quicker time in this course than any other course you have taken before. I will, before class, ask that you respond to several informal prompts on Blackboard in the hopes you will at least attempt to do this work. Homework is a small part of your participation grade but will be immensely helpful to you in thinking about the texts we are discussing and formulating a topic for your final paper. I understand this is not your only class and I respect that you have a personal life beyond our classroom. Nonetheless, I expect you will come to class having at least attempted to do the assigned reading and writing all the way through and having prepared notes, ideas, or questions to discuss with the class.

Revision is a central and integral part of this course and any writing course of merit. In order for your writing to be consistently improving, you must bring it through multiple drafts of revision. Revision, then, is a requirement of this course. You will upload free-write, journaling, even outlines and sketches, to your Google Drive folder. Failure to do so will cast a burden of proof on your having done consistent revision in good faith for each assignment, and this will be reflected in your grades.

Attendance
Each student is allotted 4 unexcused absences (two whole weeks) and 3 tardies. Absences beyond this may result in deductions from the student’s final grade. Excessive absences will result in the student failing the course. After a student has been late (tardy) 3 times, each following time the student is late will result in 1/3 an absence. This means once a student has been late to class 6 times, they will receive an absence. Students who are consistently distracted in class (texting, browsing the internet, etc.) will be warned to pay closer attention to class. After this warning, if a student is continuously distracted in class, they will be marked absent. Students who acknowledge holy days on the same day(s) we have class will be excused if they have alerted the professor of all of these by the end of three days after you are enrolled in class. Absences do not excuse any due dates or work missed.

Electronics Policy and Google Drive vs. Blackboard
Each student is required to bring tablet, laptop, or similar electronic device to class in order to take notes, complete and submit in-class writing assignments, access readings or notes for class discussion, and participate in peer review. No electronic device should be a distraction from the activities of the classroom for any student. The use of laptops or tablets is allowed only to complete classroom-related activities. If electronic devices become a distraction or a means by which students avoid class participation, the student(s) in violation will receive an absence for class that day.

We will spend most of our class time working in Google Drive, a cloud-based file sharing system to which each student at the University of Miami has access. To log-in to your Google Drive, visit google.miami.edu and use the same credentials you use to access your email, Canelink, and Blackboard interfaces. You will have your own folder within the classroom’s folder (“ENG 106 S20”). Drive is where you will submit your drafts, revisions, in-class writing assignments, reflections, and peer reviews. The only thing you will not submit to this folder is your final draft to each assignment, which must be uploaded to Blackboard. It is up to you to make sure you have access to your Blackboard and Google Drive accounts and folders at all times. Inability to access Google Drive or Blackboard will not be sufficient excuse for not turning in assignments on time. For IT help, UMIT is located on the third floor of the Richter Library.

 Academic Honor Code
As a student of the University of Miami, you have agreed to uphold the Honor Code. Violation of this code includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, or academic dishonesty. The Undergraduate Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook defines each of these violations:

Cheating – Implies the intent to deceive. It includes all actions, devices and deceptions used in the attempt to commit this act. Examples include, but are not limited to, copying answers from another student’s exam, and using a cheat sheet or crib notes in an exam.

Plagiarism – is representing the words or ideas of someone else as your own. Examples include, but are not limited to, failing to properly cite direct quotes and failing to give credit for someone else’s ideas.

Collusion – is the act of working together on an academic undertaking for which a student is individually responsible. Examples include, but are not limited to, sharing information in labs that are to be done individually.

Academic Dishonesty – includes any other act not specifically covered that compromises the integrity of a student or intrudes, violates, or disturbs the academic environment of the university community. Examples are attempting or agreeing to commit, or assisting in or facilitating the commission of, any scholastic dishonesty violation, failing to appear or testify without good cause when requested by the Honor Council, failing to keep information about cases confidential, supplying false information to the Honor Council and accusing a student of a violation of this Code in bad faith.

Title II, B

Any student who violates the Honor Code will fail not only the assignment but the entire course. Each of you has the ability to think through your own unique ideas. If you are thinking of violating the Honor Code because you are overwhelmed or in distress, speak with me and we will come up with a better solution.

On Accessibility and Acceptance
Every student, no matter their identity, ideology, or ability, is welcome and valued in this class. This class will require that we confront political, social, and ideological questions that may be deemed controversial. I encourage you not to shy away from this opportunity to think through these issues. No matter what, no student should ever feel unwelcome or unsafe in this classroom. If you find that you feel inappropriately uncomfortable, consistently unsafe, or need help, please let me know immediately and I will direct you to the resources that may help. The University of Miami Counseling Center (UMCC) provides professional support to students no matter their gender expression, sexual preferences, sex, race, financial or immigration status. You can make an appointment by calling 305-284-5511, by visiting counseling.studentaffairs.miami.edu, or by visiting the counseling center on Merrick Dr. (across from the Pavia Garage).

Students with accessibility requirements are provided for by the University of Miami’s Office of Disability Services (ODS) and may contact this office at 305-284-2374 or disabilityservices@miami.edu to make any requests for accessibility. If you have trouble contacting the ODS, let me know and I will help you. If you have contacted the ODS and have any requirements of me, please be sure to let me know as soon as possible.

Turning in assignments 
Papers should be submitted on Blackboard or Google Drive on the day and at the specified time they are due. Each day a paper is late, there will be a deduction of 10% from the grade. All assignments are assigned in due time to be completed by each student on time. It is your own job to make sure you do not forget deadlines and that you turn your assignments into the correct platform (Blackboard, email, or Google Drive). Every deadline is listed on this document in the schedule section, on the assignment sheets themselves, and verbally said in class. If you require an extension(s) for your assignment(s), you must request them of the instructor at least three class periods (over a week) prior to the due date of the assignment. Under no circumstances is the instructor required to grant you an extension(s). No late blackboard posts will be accepted.

The Writing Center (www.as.miami.edu/writingcenter) can help you at any stage of the writing process.  Appointments are suggested, but they also accept ‘walk-in’ visits.  If I think it’s necessary, I will ask you to use the Writing Center on a regular basis. Please note that all appointments are currently being held online until further notice.  To make an online appointment, make an account at the above link/sign in as usual and choose an available time.

OWL @ Purdue is a great online resource for writing and research techniques. It can be located at https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html.

Extra Credit is not available or permitted in this course. I do not allow extra credit for several reasons: put simply, it is unfair to those who have committed to the work required of this class if others are able to do extra work for credit. Moreover, extra credit requires extra effort and time to which I am unable to commit for reading, annotating, grading, and categorizing within the gradebook.

On Communication
I will make a point to learn each of your names and I expect you will learn to use one another’s name in conversation, as well (“I agree with what ___ said”). This will create a welcoming and meaningful culture for our classroom. If you have a question about the policies or assignments for this class, you may speak to me before, during, or after class, via email, or in office hours. I will make a point to reply to your email within 24-to-48 hours. If you have not received a response from me after two days, you should email me again. Please do not email me to ask questions about an assignment one or two days before it is due as this will not allow due time for me to respond and for you to use this answer in writing your assignment.

Grades
If you have a question or concern about an assignment or participation grade, please come and see me during my office hours or talk with me before or after class to arrange a meeting.  Due to federal requirements, UM faculty are not permitted to discuss grades via email or phone, so we will need to meet in person and in private.

Overall Grade Distribution:

Attendance/Class participation10%
Blackboard Posts15%
Quizzes10%
Reading Annotations15%
Annotated Bibliography20%
Research Essay15%
Lensing Assignment15%
Total100%


Grading Scale:

A940-1000
A-900-939
B+870-899
B830-869
B-800-829
C+770-799
C730-769
C-700-729
D+670-699
D600-669
F0-599
A – Exemplary B – Effective C – Sufficient   D – Unsatisfactory F – Failure

Assignments

Blackboard reading responses
The night before most reading assignments are due, you will be asked to respond to a specific prompt or question related to the reading. These responses are designed to stimulate your thinking about the text and the course themes and help prepare you for class discussion. They are also great places to start generating ideas for your essays and research projects. These posts will be graded based on completion, but thoughtful responses will enrich our class discussions and help you develop confidence in your ideas, critical reading skills, and writing. All posts are due before class time. To earn full points on your reading responses, you will need to write thoughtful answers in full sentences and/or paragraphs and submit your post before class time. *200-300 words each*

In-class writing responses
Often on Thursday, we will have ‘Through-line Thursday’ where you and a partner will connect a minimum of two and a maximum of four sources, one of which must include the reading for that Thursday. The other sources could be something we have previously discussed in this course or something you read, saw, heard outside of class. The point of this assignment is to practice making connections between different cultural texts, a skill you will be required to showcase in the research paper (discussed below). Whereas the Blackboard reading responses test reading comprehension (that you understand what you read), these in-class writing responses will test argumentation (that you have thoughts about what you’ve read). These assignments are written in groups and while quotations will be helpful to make your connections between sources, this must be original work so the majority of the writing should be that of yourself and your group member(s). These assignments are turned in on Blackboard. *250-350 words each*

Quizzes
Throughout the semester, we will have brief quizzes on common grammatical mistakes, citation formatting, and comprehension of reading assignments. All of these will be reviewed ahead of time and all will be open-notes, so you should not stress about these. However, because you will only be allotted a certain amount of time to complete these quizzes, you should still familiarize yourself with the material before the day of the quiz.

Scholarly Questions & Reading Annotation
This project asks each student to annotate readings and post questions about the readings. This is an on-going assignment throughout the first half of the semester—you have until March 1 to complete 1000 words of annotations and log them onto your annotation sheet that you turn in. The instructor will explain how to do this logging; however, the annotation that you do should be fairly simple. For each reading, the link will take you to a PDF in Google Drive. Highlighting certain words and phrases will result in a comment button appearing next to where you have highlighted words. You can annotate by clicking on this “Add Comment” button. For scholarly questions regarding the readings, you should use Dr. Kyla Tompkins’ pointers to make sure that the question you are posing is the best it can be. *1000 words min.*

Annotated Bibliography 
This assignment will act as Part 1 of your research project. After selecting a topic for your project, you will conduct research and provide an overview of the existing body of research on the topic—trace the different schools of thought or approaches to the topic, summarize what other scholars have said, and examine how they agree, disagree, and relate to each other. This is, in short, a report on all of the scholarship about a given topic (or as much as you can find). Think of this as if you are stepping into the ongoing scholarly conversation about your topic and your goal is to outline each of the strands of that conversation. This performance of research and abridging arguments of other scholars is an important part of recognizing there is an ongoing interest in the topic you are researching and it will be very important to do as you continue in your academic career. The annotated bibliography will help you situate your own argument (that of your research paper) within the existing scholarly research. Aspects of this will become crucial during your research paper since you will need to reference sources in this list in your paper. Therefore, as you are researching, you would be wise to think about what others are not saying so that you can provide the missing link. *minimum of 10 peer-reviewed sources*

Research paper
You will produce a research paper in a scholarly format on a topic of your interest that relates to our focus of study: Marxism in America. I encourage you to think about topics addressed by your area of study. This is not a report or summary of different sources (literature review). Though you will use your annotated bibliography to situate your own argument, the majority of your paper should be dedicated to developing your own argument and situating your own contribution to (or criticism of) the arguments of others. Your essay must use research from scholarly sources (min. of 7 peer-reviewed sources), put forward a clear and convincing position on your topic, and follow a single citation style, format, and set of conventions (MLA, Chicago, or APA). *1500 words min.*

Lensing assignment (potential multimodal presentation)
This assignment asks you to use a theoretical or conceptual text as a framework to read a primary text, such as a creative or fictional work. One way to approach this is to imagine yourself as the author of the theoretical text and respond to the second text from their perspective. Therefore, the goal of this assignment is to use the concepts and ideas of the theoretical text as a “lens” to evaluate and interpret the cultural text. Your paper may be given in multimodal form (with graphics, animations, etc.) or in a traditional written format. *1500 words min.*

Schedule*

Week 1

T   1/26 PPT for reviewing Syllabus, Drive, Topic

(If time permits) “What is an argument?” assignment

Homework: Read through syllabus to prepare for open-notes quiz, discussion board post: what do you think of when you think of Marxism? What perceptions do you have about it?; Watch Chicken Run on Hulu or Spirited Away on HBO Max

R   1/28 Quiz #1 on the Syllabus

“The Beast” by Claude McKay

Discuss Scholarly Questions & Reading Citations Assignment

Karl Marx and the Commodity

Homework: Watch The Gilded Age on PBS; Read from Kathleen Sears, Socialism 101 p. 1-32; discussion board post

Week 2

T   2/2 Introduce close-reading

Basics of Socialism, Marxism

The Gilded Age in America and Why it Created Labor Movements

Homework: Read from Kathleen Sears, Socialism 101 p. 33-47 & listen to RevLeft Radio ep. From Oct 11 2020 or ep. from Sep 22 2017; discussion board post

R   2/4 Christian Socialism, Liberation Theology, and Associationism

Review citation style: MLA, APA, Chicago

Homework: Read from Immanuel Wallerstein, Historical Capitalism Ch. 1, “The Commodification of Everything: The Production of Capital”; listen to RevLeft Radio ep. From Oct 1 2020; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading: 

Week 3

T   2/9 The Commodification of Everything

Homework: Read from Tony Michels, A Fire in Their Hearts: Yiddish Socialists in New York p. 1-25 (Introduction); discussion board post

R   2/11 Grammar I

Socialism in American Jewish History / Immigrant Socialism

Homework: Read from Toni Michels, Jewish Radicals: A Documentary History p. 41-69, 93-94, 97-98, 104-108; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading: 

Week 4

T   2/16 Jewish Radicalism & the Socialist Party

Close-reading Workshop 

Homework: Read from Paul Buhle, Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left Ch. 2 (pp. 58-85); discussion board post

R   2/18 Quiz #2

American Socialism, American Culture

Guest Talk on Radical Periodicals at the Turn of the Century, John Funchion (Associate Professor of English at University of Miami)

Homework: Read from Paul Buhle, Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left Ch. 3 (pp. 86-120 — see below, you should try to read as much as you can but focus your energy on the pages assigned to you); discussion board post

PgsWho focuses on them
pp. 86-97Trey, Abigail, Sam, David, Richard, Pablo
pp. 97-106Abiel, Jasmine, Vittorio, Melanie, Noelle, Nathan, Noah
pp. 107-120Jonathan O., Nick-Richard, Jonathan P., Clara, Eddy, Jesse

Recommended/Further Reading: 

Week 5

T   2/23 The First Red Scare

Homework: Read from Paul Buhle, Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left Ch. 4 (pp. 121-154) and “The Black Bolsheviks” in Socialist Worker; discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

R   2/25 Black Bolshevism & Leninism in America

Homework: Read from Angela Davis, Women, Race & Class ch. 10 and Claudia Jones, “An end to the neglect of the problems of the Negro woman!” & “We Seek Full Equality for Women”; discussion board post // Reminder: Reading Annotations due by 11:59pm on 3/1

Week 6

T   3/2 Grammar II

Communist Women

Review Annotated Bibliography assignment

Homework: Read “Propaganda of History” from W.E.B. DuBois’s Black Reconstruction in America; discussion board post

R   3/4 Close-Read Prologue of ZAMI

Culture Critique

Homework: Read from Paul Buhle, Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left p. 199-220 [for those who do not have the physical book, this is the subheading “Trotskyism and the Search for Alternatives” in Chapter 6 until the end of the chapter]; discussion board post

Week 7

T   3/9 Quiz #3

CLR James and the Beginning of the New Left

Homework: Read from Paul Buhle, Marxism in the United States: A History of the American Left Ch. 7 (221-257); Watch The Trial of the Chicago 7 on Netflix; discussion board post

R   3/11 The New Left

Homework: Read Foreword by Jonathan Jackson, Jr. from Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson (p. xiii-xxv)

Recommended/Further Reading: 

Week 8

T   3/16 Midterm Reflections

Black Radicalism in the 1970s-1980s: George Jackson, Angela Davis, and Assata Shakur

Homework: Read from Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson p. 3-31

Recommended/Further Reading: 

R   3/18 2 Letters by George L. Jackson

Angela Y. Davis

Homework: Read from The Huey P. Newton Reader p. 160-179 and at least 3 sections from the following

  1. From “In Defense of Self-Defense” I: June 20, 1967 (p. 134-137)
  2. From “In Defense of Self-Defense” II: July 3, 1967 (p. 138-141)
  3. The Correct Handling of a Revolution: July 20, 1967 (p. 142-146)
  4. A Functional Definition of Politics, January 17, 1969 (p. 147-149)
  5. The Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements: August 15, 1970 (p. 157-159)
  6. Uniting Against a Common Enemy: October 23, 1971 (p. 234-240)
  7. On Pan-Africanism or Communism: December 1, 1972 (p. 248-255)

Recommended/Further Reading:

Week 9

T   3/23 Huey P. Newton and the BPP

Homework: Prepare draft of Annotated Bibliography before class for in-class workshop

R   3/25 Annotated Bibliography workshop **Class Held On Zoom**

Homework: Read all of Stuart Hall’s essay “Cultural Studies: two paradigms” and Section I of “Gramsci’s relevance for the study of race and ethnicity”; discussion board post; Annotated Bibliography due no later than Wed March 31 at 3pm EST

Recommended/Further Reading:

Week 10

T   3/30 Review Research Essay assignment

Antonio Gramsci and Cultural Studies

Homework: Read “Introduction: Queer of Color Critique, Historical Materialism, and Canonical Sociology” from Aberrations in Black: Toward a Queer of Color Critique by Roderick A. Ferguson; discussion board post

R   4/1 Black Queer Marxism

Homework: Read the Introduction of Histories of Racial Capitalism, edited by Destin Jenkins and Justin Leroy; Listen to RevLeft Radio ep. from Oct 23 2017 or RevLeft ep. from Feb 14 2018 discussion board post

Recommended/Further Reading:

Week 11

T   4/6 Racial Capitalism

Geographies of Racial Capitalism (Short Documentary)

Homework: Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Preface of Second Edition, Original Preface and Ch. 1-2; discussion board post; watch Bee Movie on Netflix

R   4/8 Grammar III

Eagleton Preface i, ii and Ch. 1-2

Homework: Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Ch. 3 and watch In Time (2011) – links below; Prepare draft for research essay workshop

iTunes Google Play Amazon YouTube Movies

Week 12

T   4/13 Ch. 3 of Eagleton

Research Essay Workshop

Homework: Watch Children of Men (2006) on Peacock for free, or rent on other platform; Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Ch. 4; discussion board post

R   4/15 Ch. 4 Eagleton

Homework: Research essay due no later than Fri., 4/16 at 11:59pm; Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Ch. 7 and watch 13th on Netflix; discussion board post

Week 13

T   4/20 Review Lensing Assignment

Ch. 7 Eagleton

Homework: Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Ch. 8 and watch Capital in the Twenty-First Century on Netflix; discussion board post

R   4/22 Ch. 8 Eagleton

Homework: Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Ch. 9 and watch Saving Capitalism on Netflix; discussion board post

Week 14

T   4/27 Ch. 9 Eagleton

Homework: Read from Terry Eagleton, Why Marx Was Right Ch. 10-Conclusion and watch Requiem for the American Dream on YouTube; discussion board post

R   4/29 Ch. 10 Eagleton

Conclusion of Class

Final Reflections

Homework: Draft of Lensing Assignment due no later than Friday, April 30th in order to receive comments from professor;

**Lensing Assignment due no later than May 7 at 11:59 p.m.**

*Course schedule is fluid and may require alterations throughout the semester depending on different, unforeseen events or complications. All changes will be announced both in class and via Blackboard/email announcements in due time for students to receive and adjust their plans accordingly.

Migration & Citizenship: History, Theory & Literature

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI). Summer 2. 2021

Course Title: “Introduction to Critical Theory”
Duration: Six Weeks
Course: Summer 2 of 2021
Dates: June 11-July 16, 2021
Time: Fridays 3:00pm-4:45pm

Course Description:
The contemporary world has seen more changes in status of citizenship, nationality, legal personhood, and migration than ever before. It is, therefore, important that we discuss how these changes impact our lives and the lives of others with whom we share this world. This course will center around arguments of citizenshipmigration, and incarceration. We will read different accounts of experience, theory, and law surrounding these themes in order first to have a better and more holistic understanding of the issues of our present day and second to deconstruct the arguments and evidence each of the readings put forward so that we can understand how to make compelling arguments of our own. No previous knowledge is required for enjoyment of this course.

Suggested purchases (in order of importance); Please note #2 is a PDF linked to another website and #3 and #4 are PDFs linked to this website, so purchase only necessary if student wishes to have physical copies:

  1. The Penguin Book of Migration Literature (2019) ed. by Dohra Ahmad
  2. Regarding the Pain of Others (2003) by Susan Sontag
  3. Migration Theory: Talking Across Disciplines – 3rd Edition (2014) ed. by Caroline B. Brettell and James F. Hollifield
  4. The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (2014) ed by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Gil Loescher, Katy Long, and Nando Sigona

Schedule (readings are meant to be done before the class during which they will be discussed)

June 11 – Migration Studies: Discipline and Literature

Slides: Click Here

Reading:

  • Introduction from Migration Theory: Talking Across Disciplines (3rd Edition) by Caroline B. Brettell and James F. Hollifield
  • Introduction from The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Gil Loescher, Katy Long, and Nando Sigona
  • “Birth of a ‘Discipline’: From Refugee to Forced Migration Studies” by B.S. Chimni in the Journal of Refugee Studies vol. 22, no. 1 (2009)

June 18 – The Migrant Crises in America before 1950

June 25– The Migrant Crises in America since 1950 

Slides: Click Here

Reading:

July 2 – Policing the Crises: Militarization of Borders, Incarceration of Migrants, and the Wealth Behind It All

July 9 – Migration Literature, Part 1

*No slides this week/ Class was discussion*

Reading:

The Penguin Book of Migration Literature, pp. 3-40, 51-67, 105-106

  • Olaudah Equiano, from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano
  • M. Norbeße Philip, “Zong! #5”
  • Julie Otsuka, “Come, Japanese!”
  • Francisco Jiménez, “Under the Wire”
  • Edwidge Danticat, “Children of the Sea”
  • Phillis Wheatley, “On Being Brought from Africa to America”
  • Claude McKay, “The Tropics of New York”

July 16 – Migration Literature, Part 2 

Slides: Click Here

Reading:

The Penguin Book of Migration Literature, pp. 90-101, 147-152, 229-239, 161-167

  • Salman Rushdie, “Good Advice is Rarer Than Rubies”
  • Warsan Shire, “Conversations About Home (at the Deportation Centre)”
  • Dunya Mikhail, “Another Planet”
  • Marjane Satrapi, from Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return
  • Zadie Smith, from White Teeth
  • Tato Laviera, “AmeRícan”
  • Deepak Unnikrishnan, from Temporary People